Zoology

This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 4:08 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location: a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
AP News
September 19, 2019 - 11:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — North America's skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970, a comprehensive study shows. The new study focuses on the drop in sheer numbers of birds, not extinctions. The bird population in the United States and Canada was...
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September 12, 2019 - 8:43 am
BERLIN (AP) — Bottlenose dolphins in the English Channel harbor a "toxic cocktail" of chemicals, some of which have been banned for decades and which may be harming the rare marine mammals' health, scientists said Thursday. Belgian and French scientists said they've detected high accumulations of...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo a bison from Yellowstone National Park walks through the snow shortly before being shot and killed during a hunt by members of an American Indian tribe, near Gardiner, Mont. U.S. officials have rejected a petition to protect the park's roughly 4,500 bison, which are routinely hunted and sent to slaughter to guard against the spread of disease to cattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
September 05, 2019 - 2:40 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials rejected petitions Thursday to protect Yellowstone National Park's storied bison herds but pledged to consider more help for two other species — a tiny, endangered squirrel in Arizona and bees that pollinate rare desert flowers in Nevada. Wildlife...
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Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 9:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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July 26, 2019 - 9:21 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago. Nevada state entomologist Jeff Knight told reporters on Thursday the number of adult pallid-winged grasshoppers traveling north to central Nevada is...
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In this July 23, 2019 photo, Jim Andrews, a University of Vermont herpetology lecturer, holds a young northern leopard frog in Salisbury, Vt. A wet spring has resulted in a 100-fold increase in the population of the particular frog in a region of Vermont. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
July 25, 2019 - 10:16 am
SALISBURY, Vt. (AP) — A wet spring has caused one frog population to explode in an area of Vermont where throngs of the amphibians have been hopping through fields and lawns, darting across roads and getting flattened by cars and tractors. University of Vermont herpetology lecturer James Andrews...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 2:41 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
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Georgia Department of Natural Resources personnel and beachgoers struggle to keep a short-fin pilot whale from crashing into the seawall on St. Simons Island, Ga., Tuesday, July16, 2019. Dozens of pilot whales beached themselves on a Georgia shore and most were rescued by authorities and onlookers who pulled the animals further into the water. (Bobby Haven /The Brunswick News via AP)
July 17, 2019 - 12:23 pm
ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. (AP) — The Latest on efforts to keep a group of pilot whales from beaching themselves in Georgia (all times local): 3:20 p.m. A state biologist in Georgia says dozens of pilot whales appear to be heading back to sea a day after many of them came perilously close to swimming...
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In this undated image made from video provided by the University of St. Andrews, a seal copies the sounds of the song Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, in St Andrews, Scotland. Researchers at the University of St. Andrews say gray seals can copy the sounds of human words and songs including “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.” The study showed that three trained seals were able to imitate parts of the lullaby and as well as other popular tunes. The research team released their findings on Thursday, June 20, 2019 including video footage of the seals. (University of St Andrews via AP)
June 21, 2019 - 6:43 am
LONDON (AP) — Researchers in Scotland say gray seals can copy the sounds of human words and songs including "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star." The study by University of St. Andrews researchers showed that three trained seals were able to imitate parts of popular tunes. The research team's findings...
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