Zero tolerance policy

FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017, file photo, an agent from the border patrol, observes near the Mexico-US border fence, on the Mexican side, separating the towns of Anapra, Mexico and Sunland Park, N.M. An 8-year-old boy from Guatemala died in government custody early Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2018, U.S. immigration authorities said. (AP Photo/Christian Torres, File)
December 26, 2018 - 7:00 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — The deaths of two migrant children in just over two weeks raised strong new doubts Wednesday about the ability of U.S. border authorities to care for the thousands of minors arriving as part of a surge of families trying to enter the country. An 8-year-old boy identified by...
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FILE - This June 30, 2015, file photo shows a sign at the entrance to the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. A judge has ordered Monday, Dec. 24, 2018, the U.S. government not to deport a Honduran woman without her 15-year-old daughter, who have been detained together at the center for six months and fear being attacked if forced to return. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
December 24, 2018 - 3:56 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A judge on Monday ordered the U.S. government not to deport a Honduran woman, whose lawyers worry about her being separated from her 15-year-old daughter who has been detained with her for six months. U.S. District Judge Randolph Moss issued the temporary restraining order at the...
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FILE - In this June 21, 2018, file photo, an agent with the Department of Homeland Security controls access to a holding facility for immigrant children in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration is reversing a policy that required fingerprinting for all adults living in a household where a migrant child would live. Parents and other sponsors have said the fingerprinting rule had slowed placement of children in homes, in part because some members of the household were afraid to be fingerprinted. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton, File)
December 18, 2018 - 4:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is changing the way it reviews sponsors who want to care for migrant children in government custody — backing off a requirement that all people in the house are fingerprinted. The fingerprint requirement began in June amid the zero-tolerance policy at the...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo, U.S. Border Patrol detain Honduran migrants after they walked onto U.S. territory from Tijuana, Mexico. Federal judges in California have challenged more of the Trump administration's "zero-tolerance" policy on illegal immigration. Their decision in Sept. 2018 to no longer accept pleas at initial appearances led to the dismissal of many cases because the government deported defendants before they could return to court. The judges' stance is another example of how the judiciary, in ways large and small, has put the brakes on some of the administration's efforts to curb immigration. (AP Photo/Felix Marquez, File)
December 18, 2018 - 10:48 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The 14 defendants had been charged with entering the country illegally. But there was a problem: When their cases were called in court, they could not show up because they had already been deported. U.S. Magistrate Judge William Gallo quickly concluded that none of the migrants...
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Migrants traveling with children walk up a hill to a waiting U.S. Border Patrol agent just inside San Ysidro, Calif., after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the United States but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
December 06, 2018 - 3:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration separated 81 migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border since the June executive order that stopped the general practice amid a crackdown on illegal crossings, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. Despite the...
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FILE- In this June 18, 2018, file photo immigrant children play outside a former Job Corps site that now houses them in Homestead, Fla. In a Wednesday, Nov. 28, letter to the heads of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security, 112 civil liberties and immigrant rights groups, child welfare advocates and privacy activists are crying foul, demanding an immediate halt to what they call an illegal practice. HHS and DHS are obtaining information from detained children on their U.S.-based relatives for reunification, the authors complain, and “using that data to find, arrest and deport those families.” Already, they write, “families have become too scared to step forward to sponsor children.” (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
November 28, 2018 - 3:44 am
Earlier this year, the federal agency tasked with caring for asylum-seeking children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexican border officially took on a new, little heralded role: helping to deport relatives of the young migrants. In a Wednesday letter to the heads of the Department of...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens held inside the Tornillo detention camp look at protestors waving at them outside the fences surrounding the facility in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 12:46 pm
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
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In this Nov. 15, 2018 photo provided by Ivan Pierre Aguirre, migrant teens are led in a line inside the Tornillo detention camp holding more than 2,300 migrant teens in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration announced in June 2018 that it would open the temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers - and it shows every sign of becoming more permanent. (Ivan Pierre Aguirre via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 10:41 am
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Trump administration announced in June it would open a temporary shelter for up to 360 migrant children in this isolated corner of the Texas desert. Less than six months later, the facility has expanded into a detention camp holding thousands of teenagers — and it shows...
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November 27, 2018 - 9:25 am
TORNILLO, Texas (AP) — The Latest on a desert detention camp for migrant children (all times local): 12:15 p.m. A new government watchdog memo says the Trump administration waived rigorous background checks for all staff working at the nation's largest detention camp for migrant children . The memo...
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November 23, 2018 - 2:02 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Half a dozen families who were separated at the U.S.-Mexico border are still detained in Texas months after reuniting with their children. Immigrant advocates say the government has violated a longstanding legal agreement that bars it from detaining children past 20 days in...
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