Workplace safety

FILE - In this Monday, March 23, 2020, file photo, a worker walks near a mural of a Boeing 747-8 airplane at the company's manufacturing facility in Everett, Wash., north of Seattle. In an email to Washington employees on Sunday, April 5, 2020, the company says due to coronavirus concerns, it is extending a planned two-week shutdown rather than reopening Wednesday, April 8. The decision affects about 30,000 of Boeing's 70,000 employees in the state. Employees are receiving their regular salaries during the two-week shutdown, but will have to transition to vacation or sick leave after that. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
April 05, 2020 - 3:27 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Boeing said Sunday it will continue its shutdown of production indefinitely at its Seattle area facilities due to the spread of the coronavirus. The company in an email to Washington employees said it is extending the planned two-week shutdown rather than reopening Wednesday. The...
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FILE - In this June 15, 2017, file photo, bagged purchases from the Kroger grocery store in Flowood, Miss., sit inside this shopping cart. A group of Instacart workers are organizing a strike across the U.S. starting Monday, March 30, 2020, to demand more pay and protection as they struggle to meet a surge in demand for grocery deliveries during the coronavirus pandemic. It was unclear how many of Instacart's shoppers - most of whom work as independent contractors - would join the strike. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
March 29, 2020 - 6:18 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A possible strike by Instacart workers highlights the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on the grocery delivery business, where workers are worried about their safety as they try to meet a surge in demand for online groceries. A group called the Gig Workers Collective is calling...
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In this Nov. 11, 2014 photo, Ron Hudgins welds a 2015 Ford F-150 cab at the Dearborn Truck Plant in Dearborn, Mich. General Motors, Ford, jet engine maker Rolls-Royce and other companies are talking to their governments about repurposing idled factories to produce vital goods to fight the coronavirus such as ventilators and surgical masks. On Friday, March 20, 2020 President Donald Trump invoked the Korean War-era Defense Production Act, allowing the government to marshal the private sector to fight the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it allows the government to steer factories to overcome shortages, makers of heavy goods such as cars and trucks can't just flip a switch and produce something else. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
March 26, 2020 - 10:04 am
DETROIT (AP) — Ford, Fiat Chrysler, Honda and Toyota took steps Thursday to restart North American factories that have been closed to protect workers from the coronavirus. The plants would reopen in early or mid-April, restoring the largest source of cash for automakers that generally book revenue...
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FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2019, file photo, a worker gets ready to pass out instructions on how to fill out the 2020 census during a town hall meeting in Lithonia, Ga. The U.S. Census Bureau on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, suspended field operations for two weeks, citing the health and safety of its workers and the U.S. public from the novel coronavirus. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)
March 18, 2020 - 2:45 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A week after starting its 2020 count, the U.S. Census Bureau on Wednesday suspended field operations for two weeks out of concern about the health and safety of its workers and the U.S. public from the novel coronavirus. Census Bureau officials said they were continuing to...
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February 13, 2020 - 9:42 am
NEWBURYPORT, Mass. (AP) — Several explosions rocked a plant in Massachusetts that manufactures chemicals used in medicines Thursday morning, blowing a hole in the roof and leading to an evacuation but no injuries, authorities said. Authorities said there is no public health threat resulting from...
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Workers at the Mobile World Congress sit outside the venue in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020. Organizers of the world’s biggest mobile technology fair are pulling the plug over worries about the viral outbreak from China. The annual Mobile World Congress will no longer be held as planned in Barcelona, Spain, on Feb. 24-27. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
February 13, 2020 - 7:52 am
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — Organizers of the world’s biggest mobile technology fair insisted Thursday that they canceled the annual Mobile World Congress due to health and safety concerns over the virus outbreak in China. But the Spanish government disagreed, hinting that there was another motive for...
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FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2019, file photo, attendees walk past a display for 5G services from Chinese technology firm Huawei at the PT Expo in Beijing. Chinese smartphone brand Huawei says it will attend the industry’s biggest global event this month in Barcelona while more companies reported losses due to China’s efforts to contain a disease outbreak. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
February 07, 2020 - 1:50 pm
LONDON (AP) — A major European technology trade fair has a low-tech idea for reducing virus risks: go hands-free. Organizers of this month's Mobile World Congress show are advising attendees to adopt a no-handshake policy, threatening to dampen visiting executives' ability to meet and schmooze...
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FILE - In this May 8, 2019, file photo a Boeing 737 MAX 8, being built for American Airlines, is partially obscured by the engine wash as it takes-off on a test flight in Renton, Wash. A government committee reviewing how the Federal Aviation Administration certifies new passenger planes for flight has determined that the system is safe and effective but small changes need to be made. The committee was appointed by Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao in April after two deadly crashes involving Boeing's 737 Max. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 16, 2020 - 9:52 am
A government committee asked to review U.S. approval of new passenger planes after two deadly crashes involving the Boeing 737 Max has found that the system is safe and effective but could be improved. The committee differed sharply with legislators who are investigating Boeing and the Federal...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019, file photo, a Boeing 737 Max being built for Norwegian Air International taxis for a test flight, at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton, Wash. Newly released Boeing documents show that company employees knew about problems with flight simulators for the now-grounded 737 Max jetliner and talked about misleading regulators. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
AP News
January 10, 2020 - 3:33 pm
Lawmakers on Capitol Hill lashed out at Boeing on Friday after the release of a batch of emails and text messages in which company employees questioned the safety of the now-grounded 737 Max, called the aircraft a “joke” and talked about how they concealed problems from regulators. In the messages...
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January 10, 2020 - 3:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Internal documents reveal that Boeing employees were aware of problems with the Max 737 jet ahead of two deadly crashes, and that the company emphasized speed over safety during the approval process with the Federal Aviation Administration. The documents were made public Thursday by...
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