Women's Health

Pro-life demonstrators against decriminalizing abortion celebrate outside Congress in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018. The Argentine Senate rejected the bill to legalize elective abortion for pregnancies up to 14 weeks. (AP Photo/Luisa Balaguer)
August 09, 2018 - 9:15 am
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — Argentina's Senate on Thursday rejected a bill to legalize elective abortion, a defeat for a grassroots movement that came closer than ever to achieving the decriminalization of the procedure in the homeland of Pope Francis. Lawmakers debated for more than 15 hours...
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In this photo released by Argentina's Senate press office, protesters demonstrate in support of loosening the abortion law, left, and against abortion, right, in this photo taken from Congress where lawmakers are debating the issue in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018. Following months of increasingly tense debate, lawmakers are meeting ahead of a vote on a bill that would decriminalize abortions up to the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. (Delfina Linares/Argentine Senate via AP)
August 08, 2018 - 7:00 pm
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — The Senate debated a bill Wednesday that would legalize elective abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy in the homeland of Pope Francis, setting up a vote that could reverberate around the region. Argentina's lower house of Congress already passed the measure,...
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In this Aug. 7, 2018 photo, a doctor performs an ultrasound scan on a pregnant woman at a hospital in Chicago. According to a study released on Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018, first-time mothers at low risk of complications were less likely to need a cesarean delivery if labor was induced at 39 weeks instead of waiting for it to start on its own. Their babies fared better, too. (AP Photo/Teresa Crawford)
August 08, 2018 - 3:15 pm
Move over, Mother Nature. First-time moms at low risk of complications were less likely to need a cesarean delivery if labor was induced at 39 weeks instead of waiting for it to start on its own, a big study found. Their babies fared better, too. The results overturn the longtime view that inducing...
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FILE - In this Friday, Dec. 16, 2016 file photo, Michelle Flandez stands in her home with her two-month-old son Inti Perez, who is diagnosed with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus, in Bayamon, Puerto Rico. In the first long-term look at what happened to children of U.S. mothers who were infected with Zika during pregnancy, one in seven developed some kind of health problem _ranging from birth defects to conditions that became apparent only later. Health officials released the findings Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)
August 07, 2018 - 12:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — One out of every seven babies born to U.S. mothers who were infected with Zika during pregnancy developed some kind of health problem, according to the first long-term look at those children. Tuesday's study focused on the children of women in Puerto Rico and other territories,...
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July 17, 2018 - 3:41 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands is suing the state of Idaho in federal court over new abortion reporting requirements that critics say are unconstitutional and intended to stigmatize women seeking medical care. Planned Parenthood filed the...
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Planned Parenthood members from Nashville protest at Municipal Auditorium before the start of the rally by President Donald Trump.
(Photo credit: Shelley Mays/The Tennessean via USA Today Network)
Jenna Lane
June 12, 2018 - 3:44 pm
The Trump Administration is proposing changes to Title X, which funds family planning, STD testing and other health services. KCBS Radio's Jenna Lane reports...
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