Water Quality

FILE - This undated file photo shows Barrick Goldstrike Mines' Betze-Post open pit near Carlin, Nev. A three-judge panel with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Friday, July 19, 2019, that state and federal programs ensure mining companies take financial responsibility for their pollution. (Adella Harding/The Daily Free Press via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 3:54 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A U.S. appeals court panel sided with the Trump administration Friday in a mining pollution dispute, ruling that state and federal programs already in place ensure that companies take financial responsibility for future cleanups. The ruling came after the administration was...
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July 14, 2019 - 3:49 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California regulators say Chevron has not done enough to stop a massive oil spill that dumped about 800,000 gallons of crude oil and water into a Kern County canyon, and they want the company to take further action to halt the flow. The seep out of the ground where Chevron...
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Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 11:14 pm
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 12, 2019 - 9:28 pm
Tropical Storm Barry could harm the Gulf coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it's hard to predict how severe the damage will be. That's because three distinct factors are coming together at once. The storm is expected to create a surge of up to 3 feet (1 meter) and bring...
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Water flows through Conowingo Dam, a hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River near Conowingo, Md., on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Officials once counted on the dam to block large amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna from reaching Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, but the reservoir behind the dam has filled with sediment far sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
July 06, 2019 - 6:24 pm
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job of harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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In this photo provided by MARE and taken on Friday, June 21, 2019, 'plasticrusts' are see on the surface of rocks in Madeira island. Researchers say they may have identified a new kind of plastic pollution in the sea, and they're calling it "plasticrust." Scientists working on Madeira, a volcanic Portuguese island off northwest Africa, have found small patches of what look like melted plastic encrusted on rocks along the shoreline. (Ignacio Gestoso Garcia/MARE via AP)
June 25, 2019 - 9:59 am
LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Researchers say they may have identified a new kind of plastic pollution in the sea and they're calling it "plasticrust." Scientists working in Madeira, a volcanic Portuguese island off northwest Africa, have found small patches of what looks like melted plastic encrusted on...
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Johnny Rowan stands outside Burning River Coffee, Friday, June 14, 2019, in Lakewood, Ohio. Rowan’s is one of 90 active businesses registered with the state that have “burning river” in their names, inspired by the Cuyahoga River’s most famous fire. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
June 18, 2019 - 7:43 am
CLEVELAND (AP) — Fifty years after the Cuyahoga River's most infamous fire helped spawn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, artists and entrepreneurs have turned old jokes into inspiration and forged decades of embarrassment into a fiery brand of Cleveland pride. "Everybody knows Cuyahoga...
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FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017 file photo, heavy equipment is used at an ash storage site at Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. The nation’s largest public utility has agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards of coal ash from unlined pits at Gallatin Fossil Plant. In a Thursday, June 13, 2019 settlement, the Tennessee Valley Authority says it will excavate a majority of coal ash at its Gallatin Fossil Plant. .(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
June 13, 2019 - 4:06 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility on Thursday agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards (9.2 million cubic meters) of coal ash from unlined pits at a Tennessee coal-burning power plant. Prompted by two environmental groups, the state sued the Tennessee...
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Carnival Corp. President Arnold Donald, left, arrives at federal court, Monday, June 3, 2019, in Miami. Carnival Corp. is in federal court for a hearing on what to do about allegations that it has continued polluting the oceans from some of its cruise ships despite agreeing years ago to stop (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
June 03, 2019 - 3:24 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Carnival Corp. reached a settlement Monday with federal prosecutors in which the world's largest cruise line agreed to pay a $20 million penalty because its ships continued to pollute the oceans despite a previous criminal conviction aimed at curbing similar conduct. Senior U.S...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration building behind FDA logos at a bus stop on the agency's campus in Silver Spring, Md. The Food and Drug Administration’s first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA researchers presented at a scientific conference in Europe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
June 03, 2019 - 8:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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