United States Supreme Court decisions

FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2009 file photo Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, center, sits for a group photograph at the Supreme Court in Washington. Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
July 17, 2019 - 5:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens moved left as the Supreme Court shifted to the right during his nearly 35 years as a justice. That's how the bow-tie wearing Republican from the Midwest emerged as the leader of the high court's liberal wing and a strong proponent of abortion rights, consumer...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014 file photo, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens prepares to testify on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. (AP Photo, File)
July 16, 2019 - 8:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. During nearly 35 years on the court, Stevens...
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Attorney General William Barr speaks to reporters after a tour of a federal prison Monday, July 8, 2019, in Edgefield, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
July 08, 2019 - 9:27 pm
EDGEFIELD, S.C. (AP) — Attorney General William Barr said Monday he sees a way to legally require 2020 census respondents to declare whether or not they are citizens, despite a Supreme Court ruling that forbade asking the question. In an interview with The Associated Press, Barr said the Trump...
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In this photo taken Wednesday, July 26, 2017 a member of the gallery tries to display her sign while lawmakers convene during a joint select committee meeting on redistricting in Raleigh, N.C. North Carolina's nearly continuous legal battles this decade over how maps for state district boundaries are drawn don't end with a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision refusing to try to recalibrate boundaries to repair aggrieved political imbalances. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
June 29, 2019 - 7:28 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Opponents of North Carolina's district maps are putting their hopes in state courts after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that federal courts aren't the place to settle partisan gerrymandering disputes. An election reform group, the state Democratic Party and voters will go to...
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FILE - In this April 1, 2019, file photo, Mindy Nagel poses for a photograph at the threshold of her home in Cincinnati. Nagel's home is split by two House districts. The Supreme Court said, by a 5-4 vote on Thursday, June 27, 2019, that claims of partisan gerrymandering do not belong in federal court. The court's conservative, Republican-appointed majority says that voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute The decision effectively reverses the outcome of rulings in Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina and Ohio, where courts had ordered new maps drawn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 27, 2019 - 9:07 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The battle for political advantage in state capitols is poised to become more intense after the U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring that federal judges have no role in settling disputes over partisan gerrymandering. Thursday's ruling could empower Republicans and...
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Visitors line up to enter the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, June 24, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 24, 2019 - 12:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sided with businesses and the U.S. government Monday in a ruling about the public's access to information, telling a South Dakota newspaper it can't get the data it was seeking. Open government and reporters groups described the ruling against the Argus Leader...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2010 file photograph, Clemmie Flemming points out to prosecutor Doug Evans, center, where she spotted Curtis Giovanni Flowers on the morning of four slayings at Tardy Furniture in Greenwood, Miss. Evans, a Mississippi prosecutor who has tried the same man six times in a death penalty case now will decide whether to seek a seventh trial after the U.S. Supreme Court found racial bias in jury selection. (Taylor Kuykendall/The Commonwealth via AP, File)
June 22, 2019 - 6:44 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi prosecutor has tried and failed six times to send Curtis Flowers to the death chamber, with the latest trial conviction and death sentence overturned on Friday because of racial bias in jury selection. Now, that same prosecutor must decide whether to try Flowers...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2019 file photo, Attorney Sheri Johnson leaves the Supreme Court after challenging a Mississippi prosecutor's decision to keep African-Americans off the jury in the trial of Curtis Flowers, in Washington. The Supreme Court is throwing out the murder conviction and death sentence for Flowers because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The court's 7-2 decision Friday says the removal of black prospective jurors violated the rights of inmate Curtis Flowers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 21, 2019 - 11:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday threw out the murder conviction and death sentence for a black man in Mississippi because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The removal of...
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June 10, 2019 - 8:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday against workers on oil drilling platforms off California who argued they should be paid for the off-work time they spend on the platform, including sleeping. The high court said that federal law applies to the workers and doesn't require...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018 file photo, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sits with fellow Supreme Court justices for a group portrait at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Ginsburg suggested Friday, June 7, 2019, that there will be sharp divisions among her colleagues as they finish their term, with decisions in high-profile cases about the census and the drawing of electoral maps expected before the end of the month. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 07, 2019 - 4:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg suggested Friday that there will be sharp divisions among her colleagues as they finish their term, with decisions in high-profile cases about the census and the drawing of electoral maps expected before the end of the month. The justice...
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