United States Supreme Court decisions

FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2018, file photo, the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court gather for a formal group portrait to include a new Associate Justice, top row, far right, at the Supreme Court Building in Washington. Seated from left: Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice of the United States John G. Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Associate Justice Samuel Alito Jr. Standing behind from left: Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 16, 2020 - 12:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court watchers were left scratching their heads when they learned Justice Neil Gorsuch was the author of Monday’s landmark LGBT rights ruling, but not because the appointee of President Donald Trump might have been expected to side with his conservative colleagues in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2019, file photo, Aimee Stephens, seated center, and her wife Donna Stephens, in pink, listen during a news conference outside the Supreme Court in Washington. Aimee Stephens lost her job when she told Thomas Rost, owner of the Detroit-area R.G. and G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, that she had struggled with gender identity issues almost her whole life. The Supreme Court has ruled that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment. It's a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. Laverne Cox, the award-winning transgender actress and longtime trans rights activist, listens at left. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
June 15, 2020 - 3:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. The court decided by a 6-3 vote that a key provision of the Civil Rights...
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The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, early Monday, June 15, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 15, 2020 - 10:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday paved the way for a critical permit for a proposed natural gas pipeline that would cross under the Appalachian Trail, siding with energy companies and the Trump administration. The justices ruled 7-2 to reverse a lower court ruling that had thrown out...
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The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, early Monday, June 15, 2020. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
AP News
June 15, 2020 - 8:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a landmark civil rights law protects LGBT people from discrimination in employment, a resounding victory for LGBT rights from a conservative court. The court decided by a 6-3 vote that a key provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 known as...
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Flowers are blooming outside the front of the Supreme Court building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday morning, May 11, 2020. (AP Photos/Mark Sherman)
May 11, 2020 - 1:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday seemed divided over how broadly religious institutions including schools, hospitals and social service centers should be shielded from job discrimination lawsuits by employees. The court heard arguments by telephone, with the audio available live, for a...
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Attorney Erica Ross poses for a portrait, Monday, May 4, 2020, outside the Department of Justice in Washington, after Ross became the first attorney to argue in the first arguments that the Supreme Court has argued via telephone. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
May 04, 2020 - 8:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They politely took turns speaking. Not a child, spouse or dog could be heard in the background. The conference call went long, but not by that much. And with that, the Supreme Court made history Monday, hearing arguments by telephone and allowing the world to listen in live, both...
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FILE - In this June 20, 2019, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington. The Supreme Court is sidestepping a major decision on gun rights in a dispute over New York City’s former ban on transporting guns. The justices ruled Monday that there’s nothing left for them to decide now that the city has eased restrictions on taking licensed, locked and unloaded guns outside the city limits and a new state law prevents New York from reviving the ban. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
April 27, 2020 - 7:58 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court sidestepped a major decision on gun rights Monday in a dispute over New York City’s former ban on transporting guns. The justices threw out a challenge from gun rights groups, including the National Rifle Association's New York affiliate. The court ruled that the...
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Anti-abortion rights demonstrators rally outside the Supreme Court, in Washington, Wednesday, March 4, 2020, as the court takes up the first major abortion case of the Trump era Wednesday, an election-year look at a Louisiana dispute that could reveal how willing the more conservative court is to roll back abortion rights. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 04, 2020 - 4:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Çhief Justice John Roberts on Wednesday criticized as “inappropriate" and “dangerous" comments that Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer made outside the Supreme Court earlier in the day about Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. Roberts was responding to Schumer's remarks...
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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2019 file photo, the Supreme Court is seen at sunset in Washington. The Supreme Court is ruling 5-4 to close the courthouse door on the parents of a Mexican teenager who was shot dead over the border by an American agent. The court's five conservative justices ruled Tuesday that the parents could not sue Border Patrol Agent Jesus Mesa Jr., who killed their unarmed 15-year-old son in 2010. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
February 25, 2020 - 9:26 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 Tuesday to close the courthouse door on the parents of a Mexican teenager who was shot dead over the border by an American agent. The court's five conservative justices held that the parents could not use American courts to sue Border Patrol Agent Jesus...
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FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2018, file photo, Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas sits as he is introduced during an event at the Library of Congress in Washington. Thomas has made no secret of his dislike of past Supreme Court decisions written by other justices, including seminal opinions about abortion rights, press freedoms and a defendant's right to a lawyer. On Monday, he turned inward, focusing his criticism on a court opinion he wrote in 2005 defending the power of federal administrative agencies. Thomas' evolving views about federal agencies is part of a growing conservative movement to rein in the powers of the bureaucracy.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
February 24, 2020 - 9:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Clarence Thomas has made no secret of his dislike of past Supreme Court decisions written by other justices, including seminal opinions about abortion rights, press freedoms and a defendant's right to a lawyer. On Monday, the 71-year-old justice turned inward, focusing his...
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