United States Supreme Court decisions

FILE - In this June 27, 2017, file photo, a semi-automatic rifle is displayed with a 25 shot magazine, left, and a 10 shot magazine, right, at a gun store in Elk Grove, Calif. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has thrown out California's ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines. The panel's majority ruled Friday, Aug. 14, 2020, that the law banning magazines holding more than 10 bullets violates the constitutional right to bear firearms. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
August 14, 2020 - 1:33 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday threw out California's ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines, saying the law violates the U.S. Constitution's protection of the right to bear firearms. “Even well-intentioned laws must pass...
Read More
August 13, 2020 - 8:23 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal appeals court in New Orleans upheld the constitutionality of the all-male military draft system Thursday, citing a 1981 U.S. Supreme Court decision. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans said “only the Supreme Court may revise its precedent.” The case was...
Read More
In this March 4, 2020, file photo, E. Jean Carroll arrives at court in New York. Carrolls's attorney believes that when the Supreme Court decided that the presidency isn't a shield against a New York prosecutor's criminal investigation, the same principle would apply to civil matters. He contends that Carroll's defamation case against the president should be able to move forward. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
July 17, 2020 - 1:13 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When the U.S. Supreme Court decided this month that the presidency isn’t a shield against a New York prosecutor’s criminal investigation, the justices didn’t say whether the same goes for civil suits against the president in state courts. That has quickly become a question in two...
Read More
In this 1998 photo, Wesley Ira Purkey, center, is escorted by police officers in Kansas City, Kan., after he was arrested in connection with the death of 80-year-old Mary Ruth Bales. Purkey was also convicted of kidnapping and killing a 16-year-old girl and is scheduled to be executed on July 15, 2020, in Terre Haute, Ind. (Jim Barcus/The Kansas City Star via AP)
AP News
July 16, 2020 - 7:30 am
TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — The United States on Thursday carried out its second federal execution in three days following a hiatus of nearly two decades, killing by lethal injection a Kansas man whose lawyers contended he had dementia and was unfit to be executed. Wesley Ira Purkey was put to death...
Read More
President Donald Trump speaks during a law enforcement briefing on the MS-13 gang in the Oval Office of the White House, Wednesday, July 15, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
July 15, 2020 - 1:57 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A week after losing a Supreme Court ruling, President Donald Trump’s lawyers said Wednesday they're considering challenging a subpoena for his tax records by criminal prosecutors on grounds that it's a fishing expedition or a form of harassment or retaliation against him. The plans...
Read More
In this 1998 photo, Wesley Ira Purkey, center, is escorted by police officers in Kansas City, Kan., after he was arrested in connection with the death of 80-year-old Mary Ruth Bales. Purkey was also convicted of kidnapping and killing a 16-year-old girl and is scheduled to be executed on July 15, 2020, in Terre Haute, Ind. (Jim Barcus/The Kansas City Star via AP)
July 14, 2020 - 4:57 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The man next on the list to be executed by the federal government after a nearly 20-year hiatus ended this week may have a better chance of avoiding lethal injection, legal experts say, because he suffers from dementia and so, his lawyers say, can no longer grasp why he's slated to...
Read More
Two people walk down the steps outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
July 10, 2020 - 9:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Clarence Thomas spoke and Chief Justice John Roberts ruled. The Supreme Court's most unusual term featured victories for immigrants, abortion rights, LGBTQ workers and religious freedoms. The usually quiet Thomas' baritone was heard by the whole world when the coronavirus...
Read More
FILE - In this April 18, 2017, file photo Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. arrives to talk to reporters in New York. The Supreme Court ruled on Thursday, July 9, 2020, that Vance can obtain President Donald Trump's tax returns for a criminal investigation, but sent a second request by Congress for the records back to lower courts. Here are some key questions and answers stemming from the decision. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
July 10, 2020 - 4:22 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled that Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr. can obtain President Donald Trump's tax returns for a criminal investigation but sent a second request by Congress for the records back to lower courts. Here are some key questions and answers stemming from...
Read More
Bill Christeson holds up a sign that reads "Follow the Money" outside the Supreme Court, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Washington. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Manhattan district attorney can obtain Trump tax returns while not allowing Congress to get Trump tax and financial records, for now, returning the case to lower courts. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
AP News
July 09, 2020 - 12:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Rejecting President Donald Trump’s complaints that he's being harassed, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in favor of a New York prosecutor’s demands for the billionaire president’s tax records. But in good political news for Trump, his taxes and other financial records almost...
Read More
Tom Alexander holds a cross as he prays prior to rulings outside the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2020. The Supreme Court is siding with two Catholic schools in a ruling that underscores that certain employees of religious schools, hospitals and social service centers can’t sue for employment discrimination.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
July 08, 2020 - 8:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled broadly Wednesday in favor of the religious rights of employers in two cases that could leave more than 70,000 women without free contraception and tens of thousands of people with no way to sue for job discrimination. In both cases the court ruled 7-2,...
Read More

Pages