Sightseeing

The signature of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., is visible on a deal to reopen the government on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
January 26, 2019 - 2:11 pm
What's up now that the partial government shutdown ended after 35 days: WHAT'S NEW Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown...
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January 25, 2019 - 7:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — With the longest shutdown in U.S. history officially over, here's a look at how the federal government will get back to regular business: ___ WHEN WILL FEDERAL WORKERS GET PAID? It's unclear at this time. The White House tweeted that it will be "in the coming days." Some 800,000...
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FILE - This Sept. 26, 2018 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows a 4-year-old female gray wolf emerging from her cage at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan. Environmental research projects on endangered animals and air and water quality are being delayed and disrupted by the monthlong partial federal government shutdown and not just those conducted by government agencies. (National Park Service via AP, File)
January 24, 2019 - 8:38 am
The rainwater collection system is broken at the environmental research station on a remote, rocky Pacific island off the California coast. So is a crane used to hoist small boats in and out of the water. A two-year supply of diesel fuel for the power generators is almost gone. U.S. Fish and...
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Anthony Spencer, whose wife, Chastity, right, is a furloughed federal worker, holds his daughter, Sydney, as they wait in line with others who are affected by the partial government shutdown for Philabundance volunteers to distribute food under Interstate 95 in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
January 23, 2019 - 10:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — At this time of year, John Sprinkle and his wife would normally be planning their summer vacation. Not now. Sprinkle, a furloughed federal employee, is about to miss his second paycheck since the partial government shutdown began just before Christmas. With no end in sight to the...
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Anthony Spencer, whose wife, Chastity, right, is a furloughed federal worker, holds his daughter, Sydney, as they wait in line with others who are affected by the partial government shutdown for Philabundance volunteers to distribute food under Interstate 95 in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
January 23, 2019 - 2:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — At this time of year, John Sprinkle and his wife would normally be planning their summer vacation. Not now. Sprinkle, a furloughed federal employee, is about to miss his second paycheck since the partial government shutdown began just before Christmas. With no end in sight to the...
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FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2019, photo, the Capitol Dome is seen through a skylight in the Capitol Visitors Center in Washington. Last User: The government shutdown is in many ways wreaking havoc: Hundreds of thousands of federal employees don’t know when they’ll see their next paycheck, and low-income Americans who rely on the federal safety net worry about whether they’ll make ends meet should the stalemate in Washington carry on another month. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
January 12, 2019 - 4:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government shutdown is wreaking havoc on many Americans: Hundreds of thousands of federal employees don't know when they'll see their next paycheck, and low-income people who rely on the federal safety net worry about whether they'll make ends meet should the stalemate in...
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In this Dec. 31, 2018 photo, clouds cast shadows in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Comanche County, Okla. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is directing dozens of wildlife refuges including this one to make sure hunters and others have access despite the government shutdown, according to an email obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Adam Kealoha Causey)
January 09, 2019 - 12:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is directing dozens of wildlife refuges to return staffers to work to make sure hunters and others have access despite the government shutdown, according to an email obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. The partial restaffing of 38...
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A woman walks past trash piled next to a garbage bin at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. Nonprofits, businesses and state governments across the country are paying bills and putting in volunteer hours in an uphill battle to keep national parks safe and clean for visitors as the partial U.S. government shutdown lingers. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
January 06, 2019 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Interior Department will dip into user fees to pay for staffing national parks during the government shutdown. That's according to House Democrats who were notified Sunday of the department's plan to use Federal Land and Recreation Enhancement money. Parks have largely...
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The Old Post Office Pavilion Clock Tower, which remains open during the partial government shutdown, is seen above the Trump International Hotel, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
January 04, 2019 - 3:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Tourists frustrated by the federal shutdown still have one amply staffed National Park Service site they can visit — and it's at the Trump International Hotel. About a half-dozen national park rangers were on duty midday Friday at the historic clock tower at the Washington...
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FILE - In this June 29, 2017, file photo, Vice President Mike Pence, left, waves as he is introduced to speak at the Department of Energy in Washington, as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke watches. As former U.S. Interior Secretary Zinke exits Washington amid a cloud of unresolved ethics investigations, he says he has lived up to the conservation ideals of Teddy Roosevelt and insists the myriad allegations against him will be proven untrue. Zinke said he quit President Donald Trump’s cabinet on his own terms, despite indications he was pressured by the White House to resign effective Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
January 04, 2019 - 3:03 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — As former U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke exits Washington chased by ethics investigations and criticism of his actions favoring industry, he told The Associated Press he's lived up to the conservation ideals of Theodore Roosevelt and insisted the myriad allegations...
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