Science

Jennifer Haller, the first patient to receive a vaccine shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, poses for a portrait before going into the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute to get her second dose of the vaccine, Tuesday, April 14, 2020, in Seattle. Three potential COVID-19 vaccines are making fast progress in early-stage testing in volunteers in China and the U.S., but it’s still a long road to prove if they'll really work. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
April 14, 2020 - 8:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Three potential COVID-19 vaccines are making fast progress in early-stage testing in volunteers in China and the U.S., but it’s still a long road to prove if they'll really work. China’s CanSino Biologics has begun the second phase of testing its vaccine candidate, China's...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2019 file photo, a student carries her lunch on a compostable tray at an elementary school in Utah. After making a brief comeback on school lunch menus, white bread and other refined grains may be vanishing again when schools reopen after a federal court vacated the Trump administration’s rollback of school nutrition standards on Monday, April 13, 2020. (Kristin Murphy/The Deseret News via AP)
April 14, 2020 - 3:13 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — After making a brief comeback on school lunch menus, white bread and other refined grains may be vanishing again when schools reopen after a federal court threw out the Trump administration’s rollback of school nutrition standards. The U.S. district court in Maryland this week said...
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FILE - In this Saturday, March 28, 2020 file photo, medical and physician assistant students wear personal protective equipment as they prepare to screen for possible coronavirus cases at a makeshift camp for the homeless in Las Vegas. Between 10% and 20% of U.S. coronavirus cases are health care workers, though they tended to be hospitalized at lower rates than other patients, health officials reported Tuesday, April 14, 2020. (AP Photo/John Locher)
AP News
April 14, 2020 - 11:47 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Between 10% and 20% of U.S. coronavirus cases are health care workers, though they tended to be hospitalized at lower rates than other patients, officials reported Tuesday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the first national data on how the pandemic is hitting...
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Patients and medical workers wear personal protective equipment due to COVID-19 concerns outside the emergency room at NYU Langone Medical Center, Monday, April 13, 2020, in New York. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
April 13, 2020 - 8:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New York's coronavirus death toll topped 10,000 and the worldwide number of confirmed cases hovered around 2 million on Monday, even as the lack of fresh hot spots globally yielded a ray of optimism and fueled discussions about how some places might begin to reopen. The brunt of...
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FILE - This March 1931 file photo shows ampules of the BCG vaccine against tuberculosis in a laboratory at the Institute Pasteur in Paris, France. Dec. 2, 1947 file photo. Scientists are dusting off some decades-old vaccines against TB and polio to see if they could provide stopgap protection against COVID-19 until a more precise shot arrives. (AP Photo/Alfred Eisenstaedt)
April 13, 2020 - 1:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are dusting off some decades-old vaccines against other germs to see if they could provide a little stopgap protection against COVID-19 until a more precise shot arrives. It may sound odd: Vaccines are designed to target a specific disease. But vaccines made using live...
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FILE - In this Thursday, April 9, 2020 file photo, a chemist displays hydroxychloroquine tablets in New Delhi, India. Scientists in Brazil have stopped part of a study of the malaria drug touted as a possible coronavirus treatment after heart rhythm problems developed in one-quarter of people given the higher of two doses being tested. Chloroquine and a similar drug, hydroxychloroquine, have been pushed by President Donald Trump after some early tests suggested the drugs might curb coronavirus entering cells. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup, File)
April 13, 2020 - 11:40 am
Scientists in Brazil have stopped part of a study of a malaria drug touted as a possible coronavirus treatment after heart rhythm problems developed in one-quarter of people given the higher of two doses being tested. Chloroquine and a newer, similar drug called hydroxychloroquine, have been pushed...
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FILE - In this April 9, 2020, file photo, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, appears at a news conference about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Suddenly expertise matters. In the time of coronavirus, America turns its worried eyes to Dr. Fauci and other experts. That's a big shift after decades of the public and its leaders downplaying the advice from scientists and other experts on everything from climate change to disaster planning.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
April 12, 2020 - 3:02 pm
An invisible enemy is killing thousands and forcing people worldwide to cower behind closed doors. Unfounded conspiracy theories and miracle “cures” abound on social media. Politicians and pundits send mixed messages about how to protect yourself. Who you gonna call? As the coronavirus rampages,...
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This 2020 electron microscope image made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the spherical particles of the new coronavirus, colorized blue, from the first U.S. case of COVID-19. Antibody blood tests for the coronavirus could play a key role in deciding whether millions of Americans can safely return to work and school. But public health officials warn that the current “Wild West” of unregulated tests is creating confusion that could ultimately slow the path to recovery. (Hannah A. Bullock, Azaibi Tamin/CDC via AP)
April 12, 2020 - 11:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Blood tests for the coronavirus could play a key role in deciding whether millions of Americans can safely return to work and school. But public health officials warn that the current “Wild West” of unregulated tests is creating confusion that could ultimately slow the path to...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2020, file photo, medical staff members check a ventilator in protective suits at the care unit for the new COVID-19 infected patients inside the Koranyi National Institute of Pulmonology in Budapest. As health officials around the world push to get more ventilators to treat coronavirus patients, some doctors are moving away from using the breathing machines when they can. (Zoltan Balogh/MTI via AP, File)
April 11, 2020 - 8:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — As health officials around the world push to get more ventilators to treat coronavirus patients, some doctors are moving away from using the breathing machines when they can. The reason: Some hospitals have reported unusually high death rates for coronavirus patients on ventilators...
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In this Monday, March 30, 2020 photo provided by Mount Sinai, from left, Drew Copeland, RPSGT; Dr. Thomas Tolbert, Dr. Brian Mayrsohn, and Dr. Hooman Poor, stand with a ventilator prototype they developed from a sleep apnea machine at Mount Sinai hospital in New York. (Mount Sinai via AP)
April 11, 2020 - 6:13 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The woman was dying. New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital was about to call her husband and break the news that there was nothing left to try. Then Dr. Hooman Poor took a gamble. With high-stress, high-stakes decisions, doctors around the world are frantically trying to figure out how...
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