Science

Soprano Veronica Antonelli sings "Amazing Grace" from her balcony in Paris on May 7, 2020. Still struggling with COVID-19 complications two months after falling ill, her doctor had delivered troubling news: The lung scarring that sometimes makes her too tired to sing may last for months. Or maybe years. (AP Photo/Nicolas Garriga)
May 12, 2020 - 10:46 pm
An angelic voice singing “Hallelujah” echoes off the stately stone and brick canyons of a narrow Montmartre street. Still struggling with COVID-19 complications two months after falling ill, Parisian soprano Veronica Antonelli wanted the impromptu performance from her third-floor balcony to project...
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FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2011, file photo, Director of research Judy Mikovits talks to a graduate student and research associate in the lab, at the Whittemore Peterson Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease, in Reno, Nev. Tech companies scrambled to take down a 26-minute documentary-style video called “Plandemic” of Mikovits promoting a string of questionable, false and potentially dangerous coronavirus theories. (David Calvert for AP Images, File)
May 12, 2020 - 4:56 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — One by one, tech companies across Silicon Valley scrambled to take down a slickly produced video of a discredited researcher peddling a variety of conspiracy theories about the coronavirus. It was all too late. The 26-minute documentary-style video dubbed “Plandemic,” in which anti-...
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May 12, 2020 - 2:51 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — “60 Minutes” managed to win the week's ratings competition and attract the attention of President Donald Trump on the same week. With 9.5 million viewers Sunday, “60 Minutes” was easily the week's most-watched prime-time program, the Nielsen company said. The newsmagazine has been...
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FILE - This file image provided by The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows SARS-CoV-2 (orange) the virus that causes COVID-19—isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells (green) cultured in the lab. A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work. But the first so-called antigen test _ announced Saturday, may 9, 2020 by the Food and Drug Administration _ is not quite the kind sought by top government health officials. It is less accurate than the current gold standard for testing and can only be run on specialized equipment. (NIAID-RML via AP)
May 12, 2020 - 1:29 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work. But the first so-called antigen test — announced Saturday...
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A woman wearing a protective face mask walks past a closed art gallery during the new coronavirus pandemic, Monday, May 11, 2020, in Palm Beach, Fla. Palm Beach County was authorized by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis to initiate Phase 1 reopening regulations Monday, which includes limited reopening of retail establishments. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
May 12, 2020 - 1:08 pm
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — Florida's two largest counties plan partial...
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Illustration by Peter Hamlin.;
May 12, 2020 - 11:11 am
Can the coronavirus survive on paper currency? Yes, but experts say the risk of getting the virus from cash is low compared with person-to-person spread, which is the main way people get infected. Still, many businesses worldwide have banned cash transactions and governments are taking extra...
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In this image provided Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health, Respiratory Care Practitioner Craig Skirvin, wears a face shield, Friday, May 1, 2020, at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center;s Medical Intensive Care Unit, where it cares for COVID-19 patients in Lebanon, N.H. The hospital had extra face shields but needed hand sanitizer, so it swapped with another hospital on one of several new online matchmaking platforms that enable hospitals to swap supplies or get donations of them to quickly fill supply gaps. (Mark L. Washburn/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health via AP)
May 12, 2020 - 7:52 am
Facing shortages of protective equipment, two New England hospital systems tried the latest twist in internet matchmaking: online swap meets. As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, online platforms have popped up to match hospitals that need masks, gowns, ventilators and even doctors with those...
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Pedestrians walk through the nearly empty Oculus during the coronavirus pandemic Saturday, May 9, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
May 11, 2020 - 6:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City’s death toll from the coronavirus may be thousands of fatalities worse than the tally kept by the city and state, according to an analysis released Monday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Between March 11 and May 2, about 24,000 more people died...
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This April 1, 2020 photo provided by Herb Hoeptner shows him and his wife, Diane, at the UCSF hospital in San Francisco the day after surgery to donate one of her kidneys to him. Organ transplants have plummeted as COVID-19 swept through communities. But the team led by Dr. Chris Freise, interim transplant director at the University of California, San Francisco, allowed living kidney transplants for people like Herb Hoeptner, who was on the brink of needing dialysis. "When you have kidneys that have nothing left, you either go on dialysis or you die. That was much more of a concern to me than coronavirus," said Hoeptner. (Courtesy Herb Hoeptner via AP)
May 11, 2020 - 3:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Organ transplants plummeted as COVID-19 swept through communities, with surgeons wary of endangering living donors and unable to retrieve possibly usable organs from the dead -- and hospitals sometimes too full even when they could. Deceased donor transplants -- the most common...
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FILE - In this Saturday, March 14, 2020 file photo, health officials inspect bats to be confiscated and culled in the wake of coronavirus outbreak at a live animal market in Solo, Central Java, Indonesia. The World Health Organization said Friday May 8, 2020, that although a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan selling live animals likely played a significant role in the emergence of the new coronavirus, it does not recommend that such live markets be shut down globally. (AP Photo, File)
May 08, 2020 - 8:50 am
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization said Friday that although a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan selling live animals likely played a significant role in the emergence of the new coronavirus, it does not recommend that such markets be shut down globally. In a press briefing, WHO food...
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