Recreational drug laws and regulations

Trader Andrew Silverman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018. Stocks are climbing in early trading on Wall Street as results of the U.S. midterm elections came in as investors had expected. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
November 07, 2018 - 10:58 am
NEW YORK (AP) — The outcome of the midterm elections was good for the stock market in general, mostly because it didn't produce any big surprises, but it was especially good for the health care industry and several other companies. Health insurers rose sharply Wednesday as investors anticipated...
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A man looks at an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 index at a securities firm in Tokyo Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018. Asian shares were mostly higher Wednesday as investors awaited results from the U.S. midterm elections, which could have an impact on the global economy and trade. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
November 07, 2018 - 6:24 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street is set to open higher Wednesday after the U.S. midterm elections showed the Democrats winning control of the House of Representatives and the Republicans keeping a majority in the Senate.. The outcome was what investors largely expected, so while the potential for...
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Voters wait on line to vote inside the fire bay at the Armada Twp. Fire Department, Tuesday , Nov. 6, 2018, in Armada Twp, Mich. (Todd McInturf /Detroit News via AP)
November 06, 2018 - 10:59 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Michigan voters on Tuesday made their state the first in the Midwest to legalize recreational marijuana, passing a ballot measure that will allow people 21 or older to buy and use the drug and putting conservative neighboring states on notice. Three other states had marijuana-related...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018 file photo, a supporter of Initiative 1631 holds a sign referencing the Nisqually Indian Tribe during a rally supporting the November ballot measure in Washington state that would charge a fee on carbon emissions from fossil fuels. The rally was organized by tribal and environmental leaders, and took place near the offices of the Western States Petroleum Association in Lacey, Wash. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
November 06, 2018 - 10:44 am
NEW YORK (AP) — As they weighed in on the Republican-vs.-Democrat power struggle, voters in many states also were considering an array of intriguing ballot measures — ranging from marijuana legalization to boosting the minimum wage to civil rights protections for transgender people. In all, 155...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2018 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. A DEA report obtained by The Associated Press shows heroin, fentanyl and other opioids continue to be the highest drug threat in the nation. The National Drug Threat Assessment will be released publicly later Friday. Azar said earlier this month that overdose deaths have now begun to level off. But he cautioned it is too soon to declare victory. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 02, 2018 - 9:21 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Drug overdose deaths hit the highest level ever recorded in the United States last year, with an estimated 200 people dying per day, according to a report by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Most of that was the result of a record number of opioid-related deaths...
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FILE - In this Oct. 17, 2018, file photo, a man smokes multiple joints in a Toronto park as they mark the first day of legalization of cannabis across Canada. Supply shortages have been rampant in the two weeks since Canada became the largest national pot marketplace. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
October 31, 2018 - 8:40 pm
TORONTO (AP) — The name of the store is High North, but it might as well be named High and Dry because for all but about four hours of the first two weeks since marijuana was legalized in Canada, there was no pot to sell. Trevor Tobin, one of the owners of the Labrador City shop in Newfoundland and...
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In this Monday, Oct. 29, 2018, photo, Minnesota Independence Party chairman Phil Fuehrer discusses the plan for minor parties to cooperate with each other in hopes of achieving major party status in St. Paul, Minn. The Independence Party lost major party status in 2014, losing automatic ballot status and far more generous public campaign subsidies along with it. (AP Photo/Kyle Potter)
October 31, 2018 - 2:09 pm
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Call it collusion or a gentleman's agreement, but three of Minnesota's minor political parties are working together to climb back into relevance. In the two decades since professional wrestler-turned politician Jesse Ventura jolted Minnesota with a third-party upset win to...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2015, file photo, marijuana plants grow at LifeLine Labs in Cottage Grove, Minn. Backers of legalizing marijuana in North Dakota have high hopes voters will approve the drug just two years after they said yes to medicinal use. But they may be in for a bummer, since deep-pocketed outside groups so far haven't put a dime into the measure, suggesting they don't see it as a good bet. Meanwhile, opposition groups have spent heavily to publicize their concerns that approval would mean big societal problems. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
October 28, 2018 - 9:34 am
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Backers of legalizing marijuana in North Dakota have high hopes that voters will approve the drug's use for anyone old enough to drink alcohol. But they could be in for a bummer because opponents have spent far more money against the proposal. Critics say it would mean big...
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FILE - In this Aug. 22, 2018 file photo, Amanda Cahill of the American Heart Association speaks to a rally in support of a ballot initiative to raise the state's tobacco taxes in Helena, Mont. A measure to raise tobacco taxes to extend an existing Medicaid expansion is on the November 2018 ballot. (AP Photo/Matt Volz, File)
October 24, 2018 - 6:02 am
Marijuana legalization. An increase in the minimum wage. Expansion of Medicaid. Come Election Day, voters in a batch of Republican-dominated states will weigh in on these and other liberal or centrist proposals that reached the ballot after bypassing state legislatures. Pushed forward via signature...
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Democratic U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, left, and Republican challenger state Rep. Geoff Diehl participate in a U.S. Senate debate, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018, in Springfield, Mass. (Frederick Gore/The Republican via AP)
October 21, 2018 - 7:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Democratic U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren said Sunday that she changed her mind recently and took a DNA test proving her heritage because Americans' trust in government is "at an all-time low" and she wanted to help rebuild it by being transparent. The incumbent Massachusetts senator...
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