Oceans

FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 7:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
Read More
In this Sept. 4, 2009 photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, corals are seen at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico during an expedition called Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks. Federal regulators are close to approving a protection plan for vulnerable corals in the Gulf of Mexico that would create new protected zones designed to allow the corals to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida (Dr. Ian MacDonald/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)
November 14, 2019 - 9:37 am
A plan to protect corals in the Gulf of Mexico is close to becoming a law, drawing cheers from environmental groups who believe leaving the corals alone would help vulnerable ocean ecosystems to grow. The plan would create 21 protected areas off the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi...
Read More
A woman sits in a chair in a flooded St. Mark's Square, in Venice, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019. The high-water mark hit 187 centimeters (74 inches) late Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, meaning more than 85% of the city was flooded. The highest level ever recorded was 194 centimeters (76 inches) during infamous flooding in 1966. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 13, 2019 - 11:49 am
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The worst flooding in Venice in more than 50 years prompted calls Wednesday to better protect the historic city from rising sea levels as officials calculated hundreds of millions of euros in damage. The water reached 1.87 meters (6.14 feet) above average sea level Tuesday, the...
Read More
In this Oct. 22, 2019, photo, plastic and other marine debris sits on the beach on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. In one of the most remote places on Earth, Midway Atoll is a wildlife sanctuary that should be a safe haven for seabirds and other marine animals. Instead, creatures here struggle to survive as their bellies fill with plastic from faraway places. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
November 07, 2019 - 10:50 am
MIDWAY ATOLL, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (AP) — Flying into the uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Midway Atoll appears out of the vast blue Pacific as a tiny oasis of coral-fringed land with pristine white sand beaches that are teeming with life. But on the ground, there's a different...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2013, file photo, workers build a water barrier with sandbags as floodwater threaten their factory at Amata Nakorn industrial estate in Chonburi province, eastern Thailand. The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Apichart Weerawong, File)
October 29, 2019 - 9:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water. It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space...
Read More
Young Dutch inventor Boyan Slat, right, unveils the Interceptor in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Saturday, Oct. 26, 2019. Slat is taking his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean to rivers, using the Interceptor, a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
October 27, 2019 - 12:54 am
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) — A young Dutch inventor is widening his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean by moving into rivers, too, using a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas. The 25-year-old university dropout Boyan Slat founded The Ocean...
Read More
Young Dutch inventor Boyan Slat, right, unveils the Interceptor in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Saturday, Oct. 26, 2019. Slat is taking his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean to rivers, using the Interceptor, a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
October 26, 2019 - 1:22 pm
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch inventor Boyan Slat is widening his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean by moving into rivers, too, using a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas. The 25-year-old university dropout founded The Ocean Cleanup to...
Read More
The Ocean Viking rescue ship enters in the commercial port of Taranto in Taranto, southern Italy, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019. The ship run by SOS Mediterranee rescued 176 migrants. (Ingenito/ANSA via AP)
October 25, 2019 - 10:32 am
MILAN (AP) — The humanitarian rescue ship Ocean Viking remained stuck at sea Friday with 104 migrants on board, a week after rescuing them off Libya despite an EU plan designed to resolve such cases. French charities SOS Mediterranee and Doctors without Borders, which operate the ship, say they...
Read More
A sign, part of a public design installation by artist Thomas Starr, is displayed on a gazebo outside the University of New Hampshire boathouse in Durham, N.H., Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019. Starr, a graphic and information design professor from Boston's Northeastern University, created the project to address possible effects of climate change. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
October 19, 2019 - 11:05 am
DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — New England is awash in historic markers, but a handful of plaques popping up in a New Hampshire town are different. Rather than commemorating important people or places in history, many of these dinner plate-size signs detail events like rising sea levels and an explosion of...
Read More
October 02, 2019 - 7:15 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Trump administration ratcheted up its feud with California on Wednesday as the Environmental Protection Agency issued a notice accusing San Francisco of violating the federal Clean Water Act. Last month, President Donald Trump warned of a potential violation notice, saying...
Read More

Pages