Non-alcoholic beverages

This combination photo shows Jennifer Salgado, 42, of Bloomfield, N.J., with a pack of macarons, left, and a bag of peas she ordered during coronavirus lockdown. Millions of people have helped online retail sales surge as consumer spending fell off rapidly when businesses shut down. Salgado snapped up 96 macarons from a bulk-buying store, along with 24 pounds of frozen peas. (Jennifer Salgado via AP)
May 26, 2020 - 7:14 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Between technical glitches and food worries, retail therapy and sheer amnesia, something has happened to shopping during the pandemic that can be summed up thusly: rubber chickens. Melissa Jean Footlick bought some while sheltering at home in San Diego with her husband and three...
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This image released by CBS shows Gayle King of "CBS This Morning" broadcasting from her home. More than most news programs, morning shows on ABC, CBS and NBC thrive by fostering a sense that its personalities are a chummy family. Now, due to coronavirus restrictions, those family members appear onscreen in dislocated boxes, and you're invited into their homes instead of vice versa. (CBS via AP)
April 08, 2020 - 1:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For all the planning that went into “CBS This Morning” putting on a broadcast with its anchors working remotely, no one thought about the pillow. It sat — slightly crookedly — on a chair behind Gayle King in the makeshift studio set up in her family room. And that pillow, every time...
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Beachgoers enjoy a sunny day in Destin, Fla., Wednesday, March 18, 2020. There's a new type of social policing out there that's developed almost as quickly as the viral disease that spurred its arrival. It's called "quarantine shaming," calling out those who are leaving the house for daily activities or who aren't abiding by social distancing rules. And it's part of a new reality for Americans who must navigate a world of rapidly evolving social norms in the age of COVID-19. (Devon Ravine/Northwest Florida Daily News via AP, File)
AP News
March 19, 2020 - 9:50 am
The chairman of Arizona's Asian Chamber of Commerce didn't see much downside to attending a small dinner at a local restaurant to bolster the business and bring together other leaders to discuss how to help Asian-American eateries devastated by the coronavirus. That was, at least, until he posted...
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St. Louis County Executive Sam Page provides an update on local coronavirus cases during a news conference at the Office of Emergency Management in Baldwin, Mo., Monday, March 9, 2020. Page spoke Monday that county health officials used the same protocol they have used for years when working with people with communicable diseases. He said he was "disappointed" that the family of a college student diagnosed with the new coronavirus didn't understand or receive those instructions but that it was time for everyone to learn lessons from this first coronavirus case and move on. (Colter Peterson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
March 10, 2020 - 7:26 am
CLAYTON, Mo. (AP) — The 20-something college student didn’t know she had the new coronavirus as she flew home from a study abroad program in Italy, landing at one of the nation’s busiest airports. She took a train to a St. Louis station shared by Amtrak and the Greyhound bus service. Her father,...
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Entrepreneurs Kevin Hart, of Randolph, Mass., left, and Kobie Evans, of Boston, right, speak to reporters after attending a meeting of the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020, in Worcester, Mass. The commission voted in favor of licenses for a number of cannabis shops, including Pure Oasis, a soon to open pot shop in Boston's Dorchester neighborhood by Evans and Hart. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
February 06, 2020 - 12:10 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Boston’s first retail pot shop and Massachusetts’ first minority-owned marijuana business was approved Thursday, more than a year after the first shops opened elsewhere in the state. The state’s Cannabis Control Commission on Thursday voted to give final license approval to Pure Oasis...
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In this Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020, photo, Belith Ariza, a barista trainer at Starbucks, opens the doors to the community meeting space at a local Starbucks Community Store, in Phoenix. The Seattle-based company plans to open or remodel 85 stores by 2025 in rural and urban communities across the U.S. That will bring to 100 the total number of community stores Starbucks has opened since it announced the program in 2015. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
AP News
January 16, 2020 - 5:07 pm
DETROIT (AP) — Starbucks has a point to prove: There's more to the company than selling $4 lattes to rich people. The Seattle-based coffee giant that has cultivated a reputation for being socially responsible said Thursday it is expanding its effort to put more coffee shops — and create more jobs...
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Laura Maria de Almeida shows her home's water storage container, full of cloudy, smelly water, on her roof in the Complexo de Alemao slum of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, Jan.16, 2020. De Almeida said cloudy water isn't unusual in her community, but police are investigating workers at a state utility after smelly tap water flowed into dozens of neighborhoods of the Brazilian city. (AP Photo/Ricardo Borges)
January 16, 2020 - 1:36 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Rio de Janeiro police are investigating workers at a state utility after foul-smelling tap water began flowing into dozens of neighborhoods in the Brazilian city, raising health concerns and sparking a run on bottled water. Investigator Júlio Filho said police will question...
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In this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 photo, a Blue Bottle Coffee paper to-go cup rests on a table outside one of their cafes in San Francisco. The Oakland-based chain says it's getting rid of disposable cups at two locations next year, as part of a pledge to go “zero-waste” at its 70 U.S. locations by the end of 2020. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
AP News
December 23, 2019 - 10:14 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A new cafe culture is brewing in the San Francisco area, where a growing number of coffee houses are banishing paper to-go cups and replacing them with everything from glass jars to rental mugs and BYO cup policies. What started as a small trend among neighborhood cafes to...
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In this Monday, Oct. 7, 2019 photo, 21-year-old Afghan refugee Fatemeh Jafari poses for a photo at her basement Tehran coffee shop, in downtown Tehran, Iran. More than 3 million Afghans including as many as 2 million who entered without legal permission, live in the Islamic Republic, according to United Nations estimates. Jafari hopes her Telma, or “Dream,” Café in Tehran will help bridge the divides and xenophobia Afghans can face in Iran. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
October 15, 2019 - 11:07 pm
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Afghan refugee Fatemeh Jafari is living out a dream in her basement coffee shop in Tehran that is out of reach for millions like her in Iran. Jafari hopes her "Telma Cafe" ("Dream Cafe") will help bridge the divide between Afghans and Iranians and fight the xenophobia many...
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This Feb. 22, 208 photo provided by Orange County Public Schools shows a coffee stand at Cypres Creek High School in Orlando, Fla. Orange County schools did not receive dairy industry grants for the coffee bars, but the local dairy council provided chalkboard-style signs and menus. (Orange County Public Schools via AP)
July 02, 2019 - 6:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Coffee bars selling $3 iced lattes are popping up in high schools, helped along by dairy groups scrambling for new ways to get people to drink milk. It's one small way the dairy industry is fighting to slow the persistent decline in U.S. milk consumption as eating habits change and...
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