Medication

In this March 13, 2020 photo, a worker fills orders for prescriptions in front of a cabinet of drawers containing ingredients for traditional Chinese medicine preparations at the Bo Ai Tang traditional Chinese medicine clinic in Beijing. With no approved drugs for the new coronavirus, some people are turning to alternative medicines, often with governments promoting them. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
April 16, 2020 - 7:02 pm
NEW DELHI (AP) — With no approved drugs for the new coronavirus, some people are turning to alternative medicines, often with governments promoting them. This is most evident in India and China, densely populated countries with a deep history and tradition of touting such treatments, and where...
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FILE- In this March 24, 2018, file photo, a tuberculosis patient sits on a bed at a TB hospital in Gauhati, India. Doctors fear that the focus on the coronavirus pandemic could waylay efforts to combat other diseases. Resources to fight illnesses like tuberculosis, HIV and cholera that kill millions every year could be depleted by the pandemic's toll on hospitals, medical workers and supplies. (AP Photo/Anupam Nath, File)
April 16, 2020 - 4:34 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Lavina D’Souza hasn’t been able to collect her government-supplied anti-HIV medication since the abrupt lockdown of India's 1.3 billion people last month during the coronavirus outbreak. Marooned in a small city away from her home in Mumbai, the medicine she needs to manage her...
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FILE - In this Thursday, April 9, 2020 file photo, a chemist displays hydroxychloroquine tablets in New Delhi, India. Scientists in Brazil have stopped part of a study of the malaria drug touted as a possible coronavirus treatment after heart rhythm problems developed in one-quarter of people given the higher of two doses being tested. Chloroquine and a similar drug, hydroxychloroquine, have been pushed by President Donald Trump after some early tests suggested the drugs might curb coronavirus entering cells. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup, File)
April 13, 2020 - 11:40 am
Scientists in Brazil have stopped part of a study of a malaria drug touted as a possible coronavirus treatment after heart rhythm problems developed in one-quarter of people given the higher of two doses being tested. Chloroquine and a newer, similar drug called hydroxychloroquine, have been pushed...
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April 13, 2020 - 10:58 am
DENVER (AP) — Colorado has made online sales of recreational marijuana legal during the coronavirus pandemic, fulfilling one of the pot industry's biggest wishes and fueling its argument for more concessions that could be made permanent when the crisis eases. It's one of several signs emerging from...
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FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2014 photo, 7-year-old Charlotte Figi, whose parent describe her as once being severely and untreatably ill, walks around inside a greenhouse for a special strain of medical marijuana known as Charlotte's Web, which was named after Charlotte early in her treatment, at a grow location in a remote spot in the mountains west of Colorado Springs, Colo. Figi, the Colorado girl with a rare form of epilepsy whose recovery inspired the name of a medical marijuana oil that drew families to the state has died. The non-profit organization co-founded by her mother says Charlotte, now 13, Figi died Tuesday, April 7, 2020. It didn't say how she died. A post on her mother's Facebook page said she was recently hospitalized and a virus had infected her whole family. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
April 08, 2020 - 3:25 pm
DENVER (AP) — A girl with a rare form of epilepsy whose recovery inspired the name of a medical marijuana oil that drew families of children with similar health problems to Colorado for treatment has died after being hospitalized and treated as a likely coronavirus patient, her mother said...
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President Donald Trump listens to a question from a reporter as he speaks about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Monday, April 6, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
April 07, 2020 - 5:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his administration are promoting an anti-malaria drug not officially approved for fighting the new coronavirus, even though scientists say more testing is needed before it’s proven safe and effective against COVID-19. Trump trade adviser Peter Navarro...
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In this March 31, 2020 file photo pharmacist Amanda Frank reaches for a bottle of Hydroxychloroquine at the Medicine Shoppe in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Some politicians and doctors are sparring over whether to use hydroxychloroquine against the new coronavirus, with many of scientists saying the evidence is too thin to recommend it now. (Mark Moran/The Citizens' Voice via AP, file)
April 06, 2020 - 10:55 am
Some politicians and doctors are sparring over whether to use hydroxychloroquine against the new coronavirus, with many of scientists saying the evidence is too thin to recommend it now. HOW IS IT BEING USED? The drug can help tame an overactive immune system. It's been used since the 1940s to...
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In this March 2020 photo provided by Gilead Sciences, a vial of the investigational drug remdesivir is visually inspected at a Gilead manufacturing site in the United States. Given through an IV, the medication is designed to interfere with an enzyme that reproduces viral genetic material. (Gilead Sciences via AP)
April 06, 2020 - 6:12 am
The new coronavirus made Dr. Jag Singh a patient at his own hospital. His alarm grew as he saw an X-ray of his pneumonia-choked lungs and colleagues asked his wishes about life support while wheeling him into Massachusetts General’s intensive care unit. When they offered him a chance to help test...
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In this March 26, 2020, photo, Rahmell Peeples walks in his neighborhood during an interview in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Peebles, who is skeptical of what he hears from white-run media and government, didn’t see the need for alarm over the new coronavirus. Peebles is one of roughly 40 million black Americans deciding minute by minute whether to put their faith in the government and medicine during the coronavirus pandemic. “I’ve just been conditioned not to trust,” Peebles said. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
April 05, 2020 - 9:49 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just as the new coronavirus was declared a global pandemic, gym members in New York City frantically called the fitness center where Rahmell Peebles worked, asking him to freeze their memberships. Peebles, a 30-year-old black man who’s skeptical of what he hears from the news media...
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April 02, 2020 - 6:50 am
LONDON (AP) — Nine leading European university hospitals are warning they will run out of essential medicines needed for COVID-19 patients in intensive care in less than two weeks as they are increasingly crushed by the pandemic. The European University Hospital Alliance said that without countries...
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