Medical research

Leslie Begay, left, speaks with U.S. Rep. Deb Haaland, D-New Mexico, in a hallway outside a congressional field hearing in Albuquerque, N.M., highlighting the atomic age's impact on Native American communities on Monday, Oct. 7, 2019. Begay, a former uranium miner on the Navajo Nation with lung problems, says there are lingering injustices and health problems on his reservation decades after mines closed. An Indian Health Service official cited federal research at the hearing that she says showed some Navajo women, males and babies who were part of the study had high levels of uranium in their systems. (AP Photo/Mary Hudetz)
October 07, 2019 - 7:30 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — About a quarter of Navajo women and some infants who were part of a federally funded study on uranium exposure had high levels of the radioactive metal in their systems, decades after mining for Cold War weaponry ended on their reservation, a U.S. health official Monday...
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In this Aug. 2, 2018 file photo provided by Dawn Manteufel, Greg Manteufel lays in his hospital bed at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. He lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip from capnocytophaga, a bacteria commonly found in the saliva or cats and dogs which almost never leads to people getting sick, unless the person has a compromised immune system. Manteufel was perfectly healthy when he got sick in June of 2018. Over the last seven years, a team of researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, connected to Harvard Medical School, have tested other healthy people who were affected and developed a theory on why they were affected- a gene change in all the victims. (Dawn Manteufel via AP)
September 26, 2019 - 10:23 pm
WEST BEND, Wis. (AP) — It's hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she's there next to him, knowing he'll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. "We...
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September 12, 2019 - 4:40 am
LONDON (AP) — Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling has made a substantial donation for research into the treatment of multiple sclerosis at a center named after her late mother. The 15.3 million-pound ($18.8 million) donation announced Thursday will be used for new facilities at a research center based...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2010 file photo Mercedes Grand Prix driver Michael Schumacher of Germany is pictured in the pits during the first practice session at the Formula One Bahrain International Circuit in Sakhir, Bahrain. A Paris newspaper says seven-time Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher is being treated with a cutting-edge stem-cell therapy in one of the French capital's hospitals. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
September 10, 2019 - 12:59 am
PARIS (AP) — Seven-time Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher has been admitted under great secrecy to a Paris hospital to be treated Tuesday with a cutting-edge stem-cell therapy, according to a French newspaper. The Paris hospitals authority, citing France's strict medical privacy rules,...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 15, 2015 file photo, a lesbian couple holds hands in Salt Lake City. Released on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019, the largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, echoing research that says there is no single “gay gene.” (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
AP News
August 29, 2019 - 11:41 am
CHICAGO (AP) — The largest study of its kind found new evidence that genes contribute to same-sex sexual behavior, but it echoes research that says there are no specific genes that make people gay. The genome-wide research on DNA from nearly half a million U.S. and U.K. adults identified five...
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FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2018 file photo, a drugstore employee reaches for medicine from shelf in downtown Tehran, Iran. According to a study published in the British journal Lancet on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, researchers say a cheap daily pill that combines four drugs cut the risk of heart attacks, strokes and heart failure in a large study, suggesting it could be a good way to prevent heart problems. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)
August 22, 2019 - 9:12 pm
LONDON (AP) — A cheap daily pill that combines four drugs cut the risk of heart attacks, strokes and heart failure in a large study, suggesting it could be a good way to help prevent heart problems especially in poor countries. The pills contained two blood pressure drugs, a cholesterol medicine...
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August 02, 2019 - 4:17 am
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Researchers in Uganda are launching the largest-ever trial of an experimental Ebola vaccine that is expected to be deployed in neighboring Congo's deadly outbreak. The trial of the Janssen Pharmaceuticals vaccine involves up to 800 people and is supported by Doctors without...
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This image provided by the American Medical Association in July 2019 shows the amount of differences between brain scans of patients, U.S. diplomats who developed concussion-like symptoms after working in Cuba, and a control group. Between late 2016 and May 2018, several U.S. and Canadian diplomats in Havana complained of health problems from an unknown cause. One U.S. government count put the number of American personnel affected at 26. (American Medical Association via AP)
July 23, 2019 - 4:16 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Advanced brain scans found perplexing differences in U.S. diplomats who say they developed concussion-like symptoms after working in Cuba, a finding that only heightens the mystery of what may have happened to them, a new study says. Extensive imaging tests showed the workers had...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018 file photo shows an arrangement of aspirin pills in New York. A new study suggests millions of people need to rethink their use of aspirin to prevent a heart attack. If you've already had a heart attack, doctors recommend taking a low-dose aspirin a day to prevent a second one. But if you don't yet have heart disease, doctors now advise routine aspirin can do more harm than good. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
July 22, 2019 - 2:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests millions of people may need to rethink their use of aspirin to prevent a heart attack. If you've already had one heart attack or stroke, doctors still recommend a low-dose aspirin a day to prevent a second one. But if you don't yet have heart disease, the...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 27, 2018 file photo, an elderly couple walks past the Berlaymont building, the European Commission headquarters, in Brussels. Research released on Sunday, July 14, 2019 suggests that a healthy lifestyle can cut the risk of developing Alzheimer's even if you've inherited genes that raise your risk for the mind-destroying disease. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco, File)
July 14, 2019 - 10:28 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk of developing Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia even if you have genes that raise your risk for these mind-destroying diseases, a large study has found. People with high genetic risk and poor health habits were about three times more...
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