Judicial appointments and nominations

Ben Terrall holds a protest sign that reads "Close The Camps" outside of the San Francisco Federal Courthouse on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 in San Francisco, Calif. A federal judge said Wednesday that the Trump administration can enforce its new restrictions on asylum for people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border while lawsuits challenging the policy play out. (AP Photo/Haven Daley)
July 25, 2019 - 5:47 am
A federal judge has ordered the Trump administration to stop denying asylum to anyone who transits through another country to reach the U.S. border, marking the latest legal defeat for a president waging an all-out battle to stem the flow of migrants entering from Mexico. The ruling by U.S...
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Mark Esper, left, is sworn in as the Secretary of Defense by Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, right, as is wife Leah Esper holds the Bible, during a ceremony with President Donald Trump in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, Tuesday, July 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 23, 2019 - 7:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — It took seven months, but President Donald Trump on Tuesday finally got a Senate-confirmed secretary of defense to succeed Jim Mattis. Mark Esper, an Army veteran and former defense industry lobbyist, won Senate confirmation by a vote of 90-8 and was sworn in at the White House by...
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In this June 12, 2019, photo, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement official gives direction to a person outside the building that houses ICE and the immigration court in Atlanta. The Trump administration has appointed more than 4 in 10 of the country’s sitting immigration judges in a hiring surge that comes as U.S. authorities seek to crack down on immigration. (AP Photo/Andrea Smith)
July 23, 2019 - 9:42 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — In just 2½ years, the Trump administration has put its stamp on the nation's immigration court system, appointing more than 4 in 10 judges, overseeing a hiring surge, and issuing new rules that make it harder for migrants to win their cases and stay in the country. An Associated...
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President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives on Air Force One at Pitt Greenville Airport, in Greenville, N.C., Wednesday, July 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 19, 2019 - 3:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has selected lawyer Eugene Scalia, the son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to be his new labor secretary. Trump tweeted news of the planned nomination on Thursday evening, less than a week after his previous secretary, Alexander Acosta,...
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President Donald Trump calls to the media as he waits to greet Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte as he arrives at the White House in Washington, Thursday, July 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 18, 2019 - 6:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump announced Thursday that he will nominate lawyer Eugene Scalia, the son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to be his new labor secretary. Trump tweeted the news Thursday evening, less than a week after his previous secretary, Alexander Acosta,...
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FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2009 file photo Associate Justice John Paul Stevens, center, sits for a group photograph at the Supreme Court in Washington. Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)
July 17, 2019 - 5:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens moved left as the Supreme Court shifted to the right during his nearly 35 years as a justice. That's how the bow-tie wearing Republican from the Midwest emerged as the leader of the high court's liberal wing and a strong proponent of abortion rights, consumer...
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Migrants wait under guard at an immigration center on the International Bridge 1, as an immigration agent attempts to block the camera, in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, Tuesday, July 16, 2019. A U.S. policy to make asylum seekers wait in Mexico while their cases wind through clogged U.S. immigration courts has also expanded to the violent city of Nuevo Laredo. The group was returned from the U.S. after being detained. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
July 17, 2019 - 2:19 am
NUEVO LAREDO, Mexico (AP) — Asylum-seekers gathered in Nuevo Laredo, across the border from Texas, grappled to understand what a new U.S. policy that all but eliminates refuge claims by Central Americans and many others meant for their bids to find a better life in America amid a chaos of rumors,...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014 file photo, retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens prepares to testify on the ever-increasing amount of money spent on elections as he appears before the Senate Rules Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. (AP Photo, File)
July 16, 2019 - 8:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens, the bow-tied, independent-thinking, Republican-nominated justice who unexpectedly emerged as the Supreme Court's leading liberal, died Tuesday in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after suffering a stroke Monday. He was 99. During nearly 35 years on the court, Stevens...
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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., flanked by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., left, and Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., condemns remarks by President Donald Trump as he speaks to reporters following a Democratic policy meeting, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 16, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 16, 2019 - 1:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer opened the door on Tuesday to ending the procedural rule that requires 60 votes to steer most bills through the chamber if Democrats take the Senate and White House in 2020 — a boon to presidential candidates and activists in his party who have...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2017, file photo, thousands of people take part in the "Free the People Immigration March," to protest actions taken by President Donald Trump and his administration, in Los Angeles. A federal appeals court has given the Trump administration a rare legal win in its efforts to crack down on sanctuary cities. In a 2-1 decision Friday, July 12, 2019, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the Justice Department was within its rights to give priority status for multimillion-dollar community policing grants to departments that agree to cooperate with immigration officials. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu, File)
July 12, 2019 - 6:56 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A federal appeals court gave President Donald Trump a rare legal win in his efforts to crack down on "sanctuary cities" Friday, upholding the Justice Department's decision to give preferential treatment in awarding community policing grants to cities that cooperate with immigration...
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