Hunting

A foreign reporter who was selected to cover the opening ceremony of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) walks by medical workers after receiving a coronavirus test, at a hotel in Beijing, Thursday, May 21, 2020. This year's version of China's biggest political meeting of the year will be unlike any other. Delayed from March because of the then-spiraling coronavirus outbreak, the decision to go ahead with the gathering signals a partial return to normalcy in the country where the pandemic first broke out. "Partial" being the operative word: The congress will be far from normal. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
May 20, 2020 - 8:34 pm
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — Japan approves lifting state of emergency in three...
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In this Monday, May 4, 2020 photo, a wild turkey crosses a field in Freeport, Maine. States around the country are encouraging hunters to hunt turkeys this spring despite social distancing rules. The hunt will look different than usual because of concerns about the virus. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
May 09, 2020 - 5:12 am
FALMOUTH, Maine (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has canceled dozens of spring traditions, from college basketball's Final Four to Easter Sunday services, but there's one rite that's going on largely unfettered — turkey hunting. Every state except Alaska, which is the only state with no turkeys,...
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In this Monday, March 30, 2020, photo, a teddy bear hangs upside down in a window of a house in Christchurch, New Zealand. New Zealanders are embracing an international movement in which people are placing teddy bears in their windows during coronavirus lockdowns to brighten the mood and give children a game to play by spotting the bears in their neighborhoods. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
April 01, 2020 - 6:39 pm
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Some are perched in trees. Some are hanging upside down. Some are baking scones. Teddy bears are popping up in the unlikeliest of places as New Zealanders embrace an international movement in which people are placing the stuffed animals in their windows during...
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This combination photo shows Brian Wilson performing at the Rosemont Theatre in Rosemont, Ill, on Oct 6, 2017, left, and Mike Love at "Howard Stern's Birthday Bash" in New York on Jan. 31, 2014. Wilson, a co-founder of The Beach Boys, has denounced a performance of Beach Boys music at the Safari Club International Convention in Reno, Nev. The concert is being led by The Beach Boys’ co-founder, lead singer and chief lyricist Mike Love. (AP Photo)
February 04, 2020 - 10:52 am
NEW YORK (AP) — One of the co-founders of The Beach Boys has joined a boycott of his own music to protest it being used by another band member at an animal hunting convention. Brian Wilson has denounced a performance of Beach Boys music on Wednesday at the Safari Club International Convention in...
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January 17, 2020 - 12:18 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska man carrying garbage to his shed had to take cover inside when a curious bull decided to join him. A Ring home security camera captured Curtis Phelps trapped inside the shed while the bull moose, with just one antler, tried to push his way inside. The moose...
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In this Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019 photo students Italia Fraize, left, Ryley Edwards, center, and Taylor Kamrath cut into moose legs in Anchorage, Alaska. Students in Brian Mason's World Discovery Seminar program at Chugiak High School butchered a moose in Mason's classroom. (Matt Tunseth/Chugiak-Eagle River Star via AP)/Alaska Journal of Commerce via AP)
December 16, 2019 - 12:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Students at an Alaska high school have received lessons in anatomy, life skills and Alaska cultural traditions through an unusual study source: a moose carcass. About 30 Chugiak High School students de-boned, separated, ground and packaged the animal during a recent World...
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This Nov. 22, 2019 image provided by the ABQ BioPark shows Archer, a Mexican gray wolf that was born in May at the zoo in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The BioPark is among the partners working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others to recover the endangered species. (ABQ BioPark via AP)
December 13, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque’s zoo is celebrating the survival of one of three Mexican gray wolf pups born at the facility this year. ABQ BioPark officials say the pup has grown over the last several months and is becoming more curious and confident. The births of the pups in May marked the...
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Students carry a youth injured curing clashes with police at the National University in Bogota, Colombia, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2019. Protesters are calling for another mass demonstration in Colombia Wednesday after talks with President Ivan Duque hit a snag. (AP Photo/Ivan Valencia)
November 27, 2019 - 9:19 am
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombians unhappy with President Iván Duque’s response to nearly a week of boisterous protests over everything from job losses to shark hunting took to the streets again Wednesday in a continuing tide of unrest. The daily protests jolting the South American country proclaim...
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FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2011 file photo, Harriman, Tenn., resident Shannon Robinson shows the map displayed on his GPS device that tracks the location of his hunting dogs. Animal rights groups are suing California over rules that allow animals to be hunted with the aid of hunting dogs wearing GPS tracking devices on their collars. The Animal Legal Defense Fund says the hunting method is "cruel and unfair." The group says tracking devices allow dogs to chase prey to the point of exhaustion. Then hunters follow the GPS to find an animal that is easily shot. The lawsuit targets the Fish and Game Commission, which didn't immediately respond to requests for comment. (Saul Young/News Sentinel via AP)
AP News
September 10, 2019 - 3:41 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Animal rights groups are suing California over rules that allow animals to be hunted with the aid of hunting dogs wearing GPS tracking devices on their collars. The Animal Legal Defense Fund, which filed the lawsuit last week in Sacramento Superior Court, called the...
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Wildlife biologist/crocodile specialist Michael Lloret releases baby crocodiles back into the wild along the cooling canals next to the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station after having measured and tagged them with microchips to observe their development in the future, Friday, July 19, 2019, in Homestead, Fla. The 168-miles of man-made canals serve as the home to several hundred crocodiles, where a team of specialists working for Florida Power and Light (FPL) monitors and protects the American crocodiles. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
July 20, 2019 - 2:03 pm
MIAMI (AP) — American crocodiles, once headed toward extinction, are thriving at an unusual spot — the canals surrounding a South Florida nuclear plant. Last week, 73 crocodile hatchlings were rescued by a team of specialists at Florida Power & Light's Turkey Point nuclear plant and dozens more...
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