Hate Groups

FILE- In this June 27, 2017 file photo a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee stands in the middle of a traffic circle on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va. Virginia Democrats seized control of the General Assembly last week and that means Confederate statues could soon be coming down in a state that's full of them. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
November 12, 2019 - 7:33 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — An army of Confederate monuments dots Virginia's landscape but some of those statues could soon start coming down after Election Day gave Democrats control of the General Assembly for the first time in decades. Members of the new legislative majority say they plan to revive...
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In this Oct. 23, 2019, photo, artist Dread Scott, whose work focuses on racial injustice and oppression, discusses his upcoming reenactment of a slave rebellion in New Orleans. More than 200 years after the largest slave rebellion in American history, hundreds of reenactors will retrace their journey through the sugar plantation country of southeastern Louisiana. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
November 04, 2019 - 10:35 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Against the modern backdrop of oil refineries, strip malls and gated communities, hundreds of reenactors will gather Friday in southeastern Louisiana to remember a time when slavery flourished as a blight on America and some enslaved people fought back. They plan to reenact the...
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This Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, photograph, shows an aerial view of Temple Emanuel in Pueblo, Colo. Richard Holzer was charged with a federal hate crime Monday, Nov. 4, 2019, for his part in a plot to bomb the synagogue, which is the second-oldest congregation in Colorado. (Zachary Allen/The Pueblo Chieftain via AP)
November 04, 2019 - 5:38 pm
DENVER (AP) — A man who repeatedly espoused anti-Semitic views has been arrested in a plot to bomb a historic Colorado synagogue, federal officials said Monday. The co-conspirators in the plot turned out to be undercover agents, who arrested the man shortly before he planned to bomb the synagogue...
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FILE - This June 14, 2012, file photo shows James Hart Stern, of Jackson, Miss., at a news conference in Jackson, Miss. Stern, who took control of one of the nation's largest neo-Nazi groups, and vowed to dismantle it, has died amid a legal fight over who would lead the group. James Stern died Oct. 11, 2019 after getting hospice care for cancer, according to one of his attorneys, Bob Ross, and a friend, Arne Edward List. Stern died at home in Moreno Valley, California, List said. He was 55. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)
November 04, 2019 - 3:07 pm
A black activist who took control of one of the nation's largest neo-Nazi groups — and vowed to dismantle it — has died amid a legal fight over who would lead the group. James Stern died Oct. 11 after getting hospice care for cancer, according to one of his attorneys, Bob Ross, and a friend, Arne...
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Louisiana's Republican gubernatorial candidate Eddie Rispone greets supporters and talks to media on a campaign stop at New Orleans International Airport in Kenner, La., Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. Rispone says a radio ad linking him and President Donald Trump to former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke is "disgusting." Rispone is blaming Democratic incumbent John Bel Edwards for the advertising by the New Orleans-based Black Organization for Leadership Development. There's no evidence Edwards is connected to the effort. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
November 04, 2019 - 12:57 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana's Republican gubernatorial candidate Eddie Rispone said a radio ad linking him and President Donald Trump to former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke is "disgusting," and he's using it to rally support from pro-Trump voters. Rispone blamed Democratic incumbent John...
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FIlE - This Oct. 15, 2019 file photo shows Kristen Clarke, President and Executive Director Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights Under Law in Washington. A Connecticut police officer, officer Kevin P. Wilcox, has retired after Committee for Civil Rights Under Law raised concerns about his membership with Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies. East Hampton Town Manager David Cox says Wilcox retired on Oct. 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
November 01, 2019 - 7:57 am
A Connecticut police officer has retired after a civil rights organization raised concerns about his membership in a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, a town official said Friday. Officer Kevin P. Wilcox retired from the East Hampton Police Department on...
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October 20, 2019 - 4:31 pm
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — A Jewish civil rights group says at least 12 white supremacists have been arrested on allegations of plotting, threatening or carrying out anti-Semitic attacks in the U.S. since the massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue nearly one year ago. The Anti-Defamation League's Center...
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In this Nov. 14, 2018 photo, East Hampton, Conn., Police Chief Dennis Woessner addresses the Town Council in East Hampton. Chief Woessner has concluded that an officer's membership in a far-right group infamous for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies didn't violate any department policies. Woessner said that officer Kevin P. Wilcox is no longer associated with the Proud Boys group. (Jeff Mill/The Middletown Press via AP)
October 15, 2019 - 3:43 pm
A Connecticut police officer's membership in the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, didn't violate department policies, the town's police chief has concluded in response to a civil rights group's concerns. The East Hampton officer, Kevin P...
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October 08, 2019 - 2:22 am
DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Books on a young white supremacist's awakening and on Iranian refugees in Sweden are winners of awards celebrating literature's power to promote peace and understanding. Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials say Eli Saslow's "Rising Out of Hatred" won for nonfiction and Golnaz...
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Pages from a confidential whistleblower's report obtained by The Associated Press, along with two printed Facebook pages that were active on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, are photographed in Washington. Facebook likes to say that its automated systems remove the vast majority of prohibited content glorifying the Islamic State group and al-Qaida before it’s reported. But a whistleblower’s complaint shows that Facebook itself has inadvertently produced dozens of pages in their names. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
September 18, 2019 - 2:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the face of criticism that Facebook is not doing enough to combat extremist messaging, the company likes to say that its automated systems remove the vast majority of prohibited content glorifying the Islamic State group and al-Qaida before it's reported. But a whistleblower's...
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