Government pay

FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2017, file photo a recruiter from the postal service, right, speaks with an attendee of a job fair in the cafeteria of Deer Lakes High School in Cheswick, Pa. U.S. employers likely kept adding jobs at a healthy pace in January even in the face of threats ranging from weakening global growth to the Trump administration's trade war with China to the partial shutdown of the government. On Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, the Labor Department will issue the monthly employment report, the first major economic report to cover most of the 35-day shutdown period that ended a week ago. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
January 31, 2019 - 2:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers likely kept adding jobs at a healthy pace in January even in the face of threats ranging from weakening global growth to the Trump administration's trade war with China to the partial shutdown of the government. On Friday, the Labor Department will issue the monthly...
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FILE - This Sept. 2, 2010 file photo shows a woman walking along the beach in Frisco, N.C. on Hatteras Island. Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown came to an end. The National Park Service said it was working on reopening all of its parks as quickly as possible, but some parks may not open immediately depending on their staff size and complexity. The Virgin Islands National Park, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, the Wright Brothers National Memorial and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park were among the parks that reopened Saturday, Jan. 26, 2019. Grand Canyon National Park issued a statement saying it would be fully operational this week. (Steve Earley/The Virginian-Pilot via AP, File)
January 26, 2019 - 10:01 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown came to an end. While there were signs that some government...
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The signature of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif., is visible on a deal to reopen the government on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
January 26, 2019 - 2:11 pm
What's up now that the partial government shutdown ended after 35 days: WHAT'S NEW Park rangers were once again greeting visitors at some national parks across the United States and flight operations at major airports were returning to normal on Saturday, one day after a partial government shutdown...
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In this Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, photo, mechanic Terry Rose talks about the government shutdown at his business in Fort Hancock, Texas. A poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research suggests staunch supporters of President Trump like Rose may be becoming harder to find, though. It showed that a majority of Americans blame the president for the shutdown and reject his argument that spending $5.7 billion on a border wall will significantly reduce crime, boost the U.S. economy or deter drug smugglers. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
January 26, 2019 - 1:09 pm
FORT HANCOCK, Texas (AP) — Donald Trump didn't carry many parts of Texas' heavily Democratic areas along the border with Mexico, but he won remote Hudspeth County thanks to people like Terry Rose. And the 71-year-old mechanic saw the longest shutdown in U.S. history as a campaign promise kept. "I...
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FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2019 file photo Cheryl Monroe, right, a Food and Drug Administration employee, and Bertrice Sanders, a Social Security Administration employee, rally to call for an end to the partial government shutdown in Detroit. The government shutdown left an especially painful toll for African-Americans who make up nearly 20 percent of the federal workforce and historically have been on the low end of the government pay scale. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management says African-Americans make up about 18 percent of the federal workforce of approximately 2.1 million employees. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, file)
January 26, 2019 - 10:11 am
DETROIT (AP) — For Cheryl Monroe and generations of other African-Americans, federal government jobs have long been a path to the middle class and a way to provide a comfortable life for their families. Then the record-long government shutdown hit, making it hard for the U.S. Food and Drug...
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FILE - In this Jan. 3, 2019 file photo, Rebecca Maclean, a housing program specialist for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Pittsburgh, stands outside her home in Pittsburgh. Maclean, whose furlough began Dec. 21, was washing dishes and listening to NPR when the news broke of a deal to temporarily end the shutdown. She isn’t celebrating quite yet. “I’m cautiously optimistic at this point,” she said. “Until (Trump) puts ink to paper, I’m not going to check my bank balance.” (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
January 25, 2019 - 7:56 pm
Federal workers who have gone a month without getting paid during the longest government shutdown in U.S. history expressed relief Friday that a deal had been reached to end the impasse, but are worried they'll be in the same spot in a few weeks. Ivan Tauler and his wife spent an exhausting three...
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January 25, 2019 - 7:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — With the longest shutdown in U.S. history officially over, here's a look at how the federal government will get back to regular business: ___ WHEN WILL FEDERAL WORKERS GET PAID? It's unclear at this time. The White House tweeted that it will be "in the coming days." Some 800,000...
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President Donald Trump waves as he walks through the Colonnade from the Oval Office of the White House on arrival to announce a deal to temporarily reopen the government, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
January 25, 2019 - 6:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Submitting to mounting pressure amid growing disruption, President Donald Trump signed a bill Friday to reopen the government for three weeks, backing down from his demand that Congress give him money for his border wall before federal agencies get back to work. Standing alone in...
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President Donald Trump announces a deal to temporarily reopen the government, in the Rose Garden of the White House, Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
January 25, 2019 - 6:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the partial government shutdown (all times local): 9:25 p.m. President Donald Trump has signed a bill that temporarily opens the federal government for three weeks, ending the longest shutdown in U.S. history at 35 days. The White House says Trump signed the measure...
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FILE - In this June 22, 2018, file photo, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Ross, one of the richest people in President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, is questioning why furloughed federal workers are reluctant to take out loans to get through the government shutdown. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
January 25, 2019 - 1:04 am
NEW YORK (AP) — One White House aide mused that the shutdown was like a paid vacation for some furloughed workers. President Donald Trump's daughter-in-law said employees' "little bit of pain" was worth it for the good of the country. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross questioned why cash-poor workers...
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