Global positioning systems

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2011 file photo, Harriman, Tenn., resident Shannon Robinson shows the map displayed on his GPS device that tracks the location of his hunting dogs. Animal rights groups are suing California over rules that allow animals to be hunted with the aid of hunting dogs wearing GPS tracking devices on their collars. The Animal Legal Defense Fund says the hunting method is "cruel and unfair." The group says tracking devices allow dogs to chase prey to the point of exhaustion. Then hunters follow the GPS to find an animal that is easily shot. The lawsuit targets the Fish and Game Commission, which didn't immediately respond to requests for comment. (Saul Young/News Sentinel via AP)
AP News
September 10, 2019 - 3:41 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Animal rights groups are suing California over rules that allow animals to be hunted with the aid of hunting dogs wearing GPS tracking devices on their collars. The Animal Legal Defense Fund, which filed the lawsuit last week in Sacramento Superior Court, called the...
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June 06, 2019 - 12:36 pm
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on School Shooting-Florida (all times local): 3:30 p.m. A former Florida deputy charged with 11 criminal counts for failing to confront the gunman in the Parkland school massacre has been released from jail after a judge reduced his bail and lifted other...
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February 24, 2019 - 6:05 am
HELSINKI (AP) — Estonian construction workers got the shock of their lives when they found out the animal they saved from an icy river was not a dog but a wolf. Rando Kartsepp, Robin Sillamae and Erki Vali told the Postimees newspaper they were working at the Sindi dam on the frozen Parnu River in...
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FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2018, file photo, a child and a woman wait outside a school entrance mounted with surveillance cameras and barricades with multiple layers of barbed wire in Peyzawat, western China's Xinjiang region. The Chinese database Victor Gevers found online was not just a collection of old personal details. The discovery by Gevers, a Dutch cybersecurity researcher who revealed it on Twitter last week, has given a rare glimpse into China’s extensive surveillance of Xinjiang, a remote region home to an ethnic minority population that is largely Muslim. The area has been blanketed with police checkpoints and security cameras that apparently are doing more than just recording what happens. The database Gevers found appears to have been recording people’s movements tracked by facial recognition technology, he said, logging more than 6.7 million coordinates in a span of 24 hours. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
February 19, 2019 - 2:37 am
BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese database Victor Gevers found online was not just a collection of old personal details. It was a compilation of real-time data on more than 2.5 million people in western China, updated constantly with GPS coordinates of their precise whereabouts. Alongside their names,...
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FILE - In this July 20, 2016 file photo, six fitness tracking devices measuring step counts and other fitness features are worn in New York. A new Pentagon order says military troops and other defense personnel on certain sensitive bases and warzone areas won’t be allowed to use fitness tracker or cellphone applications that can reveal their location. The memo stops short of banning the fitness trackers or other electronic devices, which are often linked to cell phone applications and can provide the users’ GPS details to social media. It says GPS technologies present significant risk to personnel. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
August 06, 2018 - 5:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Military troops and other defense personnel at sensitive bases or certain high-risk warzone areas won't be allowed to use fitness-tracker or cellphone applications that can reveal their location, according to a new Pentagon order. The memo, obtained by The Associated Press, stops...
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