Environmental science

Poland's Environment Minister Henryk Kowalczyk talks of the efforts that Poland is taking to limit its greenhouse gas emissions during a session of U.N. climate summit in Katowice, Poland, Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
December 11, 2018 - 2:59 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — The world needs to "do more and faster" to prevent global warming on a scale that would cause irreversible environmental damage and hit poor societies hard, the head of the U.N.'s top science panel on climate change said Tuesday. Hoesung Lee, who chairs the Intergovernmental...
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A metal sculpture sits in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018 as Greenpeace activists protest against Germany's strategy against global warming. (Gregor Fischer/dpa via AP)
December 11, 2018 - 9:42 am
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — The Latest on U.N. climate talks in Poland (all times local): 6:35 p.m. The environment minister of the Maldives is taking a stand for the planet — and wants everyone else to do the same. During his speech at the U.N. climate summit in Poland, Hussain Rasheed Hassan called...
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In this undated photo provided by researchers in December 2018, a male tungara frog in Panama uses his vocal sac to call out in Gamboa, Panama. A study released on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, examines why these amphibians adapt their mating calls in urban areas _ an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests. (Adam Dunn via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 8:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — City frogs and rainforest frogs don't sing the same tune, researchers have found. A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas — an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on...
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Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler signs an order withdrawing an Obama era emissions standards policy, at the EPA Headquarters in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
December 06, 2018 - 4:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency acted again Thursday to ease rules on the sagging U.S. coal industry, this time scaling back what would have been a tough control on climate-changing emissions from any new coal plants. The latest Trump administration targeting of legacy Obama...
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FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2018 file photo, firefighter Jose Corona sprays water as flames from the Camp Fire consume a home in Magalia, Calif. A massive new federal report warns that extreme weather disasters, like California’s wildfires and 2018’s hurricanes, are worsening in the United States. The White House report quietly issued Friday, Nov. 23 also frequently contradicts President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
November 24, 2018 - 3:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — As California's catastrophic wildfires recede and people rebuild after two hurricanes, a massive new federal report warns that these types of disasters are worsening in the United States because of global warming. The White House report quietly issued Friday also frequently...
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Pavel Kabat, WMO Chief Scientist and Research Director, speaks about the release of WMO Greenhouse Gas Bulletin with details on annual average concentration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, during a press conference, at the European headquarters of the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, Nov. 22, 2018. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)
November 22, 2018 - 5:59 am
GENEVA (AP) — A top U.N. scientist on Thursday shrugged off an online quip from U.S. President Donald Trump that questioned global warming, saying a U.S. government report will show the "fundamental impacts of climate change on the U.S. continent." Officials at the World Meteorological Organization...
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In this Oct. 8, 2018 photo, shows the entrance to the Chacaltaya atmospheric observatory, at Chacaltaya mountain, Bolivia. The station is an important place to collect data samples partly due to its own location on the remnants of a glacier. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
November 07, 2018 - 9:35 pm
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — The snow appears to be pristine on the Andean peaks that loom above Bolivia's capital, but even here ash and smog reach up to a remote plateau that is home to the world's highest atmospheric observatory. It's an ideal site for a team of international scientists who collect...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014, file photo, Dustin Shaw lifts debris as he searches through what is left of his sister's house at Parkwood Meadows neighborhood after a tornado in Vilonia, Ark. A new study finds that tornado activity is generally shifting eastward to areas just east of the Mississippi River that are more vulnerable such as Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. And it's going down in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
October 17, 2018 - 2:06 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds that over the past few decades U.S. tornadoes have shifted — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east. Scientists aren't quite certain why. The study is in Wednesday's journal Climate and...
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FILE - In this Jan. 29, 2010 file photo, then Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Senior Fellow Paul Romer attends the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Two researchers at American universities have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize for Economics. Yale University's William Nordhaus was named for integrating climate change into long term macroeconomic analysis and New York University's Paul Romer was awarded for factoring technological innovation into macroeconomics. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)
October 08, 2018 - 6:56 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in economics on Monday, one for studying the economics of climate change and the other for showing how to help foster the innovation needed to solve such a problem. William Nordhaus of Yale University and Paul Romer of New York University will...
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FILE--In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. A new scientific effort will map the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
October 04, 2018 - 4:40 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A new scientific effort will sequence the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction. The collaboration announced Thursday involves scientists with the National Oceanic and...
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