Diagnosis and treatment

Cancer patient Kim Lauerman poses for a portrait in her home Wednesday, June 26, 2019, in Alpharetta, Ga. After Lauerman was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, doctors wanted to give her a drug that helps prevent infections and fever during chemotherapy. Her insurer said no. Doctors say they worry about the growing influence insurers have over patient care. They say treatment delays and the problems they create are becoming common because routine things like imaging exams or prescriptions now require insurer approval first. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
July 29, 2019 - 11:01 am
After Kim Lauerman was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, doctors wanted to give her a drug that helps prevent infections and fever during chemotherapy. Her insurer said no. Anthem Blue Cross told Lauerman the drug wasn't necessary. She eventually got it after an infection landed her in the hospital,...
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In this Wednesday, July 17, 2019, photo, Laurie Barber, a Little Rock, Ark., ophthalmologist, talks with patient Carolyn Lay at the Little Rock Eye Clinic. Barber chairs a group that wants to hold a referendum on a new Arkansas law that expands the procedures that optometrists can perform. Arkansas optometrists who say they have to refer patients sometimes as far as an hour away successfully urged the Legislature this year to expand what procedures they can perform. But that change sparked an expensive and heated lobbying fight, and now faces the prospect of going before voters next year. (AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo)
July 26, 2019 - 7:00 am
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — As an optometrist in the small Arkansas town of Osceola, Matthew Jones must tell patients several times a week to seek treatment elsewhere — sometimes as far as an hour away — for procedures he says he's fully capable of performing. "They look at me and ask, 'Why don't you...
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In this June 15, 2018 photo, pharmaceuticals are seen in North Andover, Mass. A prescription drug compromise that would lower costs for Medicare recipients has cleared a key hurdle in the Senate, but Republican resistance signals trouble when the legislation goes to the floor. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
July 25, 2019 - 5:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A prescription drug compromise that would lower costs for Medicare recipients and save billions for Medicare and Medicaid cleared a key hurdle in the Senate on Thursday, but Republican resistance signaled trouble as the legislation faces floor consideration. The Finance Committee...
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FILE - This April 30, 2007, file photo, shows the headquarters of Cardinal Health in Dublin, Ohio. An executive at Cardinal Health, one of the nation’s largest drug distribution companies, said in a legal proceeding that the business has no obligation to the public when it comes to shipping prescription opioid painkillers. That’s one of the disclosures in thousands of pages of court documents made public July 23, 2019, in lawsuits over the opioid crisis. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
July 24, 2019 - 11:56 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In 2012, as the death toll from the nation's opioid crisis mounted, drug companies shipped out enough of the powerful and addictive painkillers for every man, woman and child in the U.S. to have nearly a 20-day supply. In some counties, mostly in Appalachia, it was well over 100...
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July 23, 2019 - 5:44 pm
CINCINNATI (AP) — An Ohio hospital paid the estate of astronaut Neil Armstrong $6 million in a confidential agreement to settle allegations that post-surgical complications led to Armstrong's 2012 death, according to court documents and a report in the New York Times. The 2014 settlement went to 10...
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In this June 15, 2018 photo, pharmaceuticals are seen in North Andover, Mass. Two senior senators — a Republican and a Democrat — unveiled compromise legislation Tuesday to reduce prescription drug costs for millions of Medicare recipients, while saving money for federal and state health care programs that serve seniors and low-income people. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
July 23, 2019 - 4:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two veteran senators — a Republican and a Democrat — unveiled compromise legislation Tuesday to reduce prescription drug costs for millions of Medicare recipients, while saving money for federal and state health care programs serving seniors and low-income people. Iowa Republican...
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July 23, 2019 - 2:37 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Americana singer-songwriter John Prine is postponing several shows this summer so he can have surgery to insert a stent to prevent a stroke. A statement on Prine's website on Tuesday said Prine's doctors told him he had an elevated risk of stroke and he plans to have the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 4:59 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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FILE - This Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018 file photo shows an arrangement of aspirin pills in New York. A new study suggests millions of people need to rethink their use of aspirin to prevent a heart attack. If you've already had a heart attack, doctors recommend taking a low-dose aspirin a day to prevent a second one. But if you don't yet have heart disease, doctors now advise routine aspirin can do more harm than good. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
July 22, 2019 - 2:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study suggests millions of people may need to rethink their use of aspirin to prevent a heart attack. If you've already had one heart attack or stroke, doctors still recommend a low-dose aspirin a day to prevent a second one. But if you don't yet have heart disease, the...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 7:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
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