Diagnosis and treatment

In this Nov. 22, 2019, photo, Charles Flagg, who is stricken with Alzheimer's disease, receives the contents of an intravenous bag while participating in a study on the drug Aducanumab at Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I. New results were released on the experimental medicine whose maker claims it can slow the decline of Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
December 05, 2019 - 9:16 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A company that claims to have the first drug to slow mental decline from Alzheimer's disease made its case to scientists Thursday, disclosing more results that may help explain why one study of the experimental medicine succeeded and another failed. Excitement and skepticism have...
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Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrives to make a statement at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Pelosi announced that the House is moving forward to draft articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
December 05, 2019 - 8:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The House will hold a showdown vote next week on Speaker Nancy Pelosi's bill empowering Medicare to negotiate prices for costly prescription drugs, her office announced Thursday. Democrats have said they would plow billions of dollars in projected savings from the legislation into...
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This undated photo provided by Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc. shows a bottle of Nuplazid, a drug that was tested for treating psychosis related to dementia. If regulators agree, the drug could become the first treatment specifically for dementia-related psychosis and the first new medicine for Alzheimer's in nearly two decades. Results from a study on the drug were disclosed Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019, at an Alzheimer's conference in San Diego. (Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc. via AP)
December 04, 2019 - 5:53 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A drug that curbs delusions in Parkinson's patients did the same for people with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia in a study that was stopped early because the benefit seemed clear. If regulators agree, the drug could become the first treatment specifically for...
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This undated photo provided by MIT/Langer Lab shows a star-shaped gastric resident dosage form of birth control that can be folded into a standard capsule and orally ingested. The dosage form resides in the stomach for up to a month where it releases the contraceptive drug.​ (Paramesh Karandikar/MIT/Langer Lab via AP)
December 04, 2019 - 11:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Birth control pills work great if women remember to take them every day but missing doses can mean a surprise pregnancy. Now scientists have figured out how to pack a month’s supply into one capsule. The trick: A tiny star-shaped gadget that unfolds in the stomach and gradually...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar pauses while speaking during a Cabinet meeting at the White House, in Washington. The government opened a new program Tuesday to provide an HIV prevention drug for free to people who need the protection but have no insurance to pay for it. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
December 03, 2019 - 6:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government launched a new program on Tuesday to provide an HIV prevention drug for free to people who need the protection but have no insurance to pay for it. Taking certain anti-HIV drugs every day dramatically reduces the chances that someone who is still healthy becomes...
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December 03, 2019 - 2:48 am
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — An official says Poland's powerful ruling party leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski has successfully undergone a planned knee surgery. Law and Justice party official Malgorzata Gosiewska said Tuesday he was doing fine. Gosiewska told RMF FM radio that Kaczynski will be returning to work...
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Mayor Lori Lightfoot announces the firing Monday, Dec. 2, 2019 of Chicago Police Supt. Eddie Johnson. (Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
December 02, 2019 - 4:45 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot fired the city’s retiring police superintendent Monday, citing “ethical lapses” that included telling lies about a recent incident in which Eddie Johnson was found asleep at the wheel of his car after having drinks. Named to the job in the wake of a...
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A general view during a Parliamentary session in Bratislava, Slovakia, Friday, Nov. 29, 2019. Lawmakers in Slovakia are scheduled to debate a proposed law that would compel women seeking an abortion to first have an ultrasound and listen to the heartbeat of the embryo or fetus, a move many groups have decried as a backward step for women’s rights. The bill was submitted by three members of the conservative Slovak National Party, who wrote that it is intended “to ensure that women are informed about the current stage of their pregnancy” before having an abortion. (Pavol Zachar/TASR via AP)
November 29, 2019 - 4:38 am
LONDON (AP) — Lawmakers in Slovakia are scheduled to debate a proposed law Friday that would compel women seeking an abortion to first have an ultrasound and listen to the heartbeat of the embryo or fetus, a move many groups have decried as a backward step for women’s rights. The bill was submitted...
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FILE - This undated photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a scanning electron micrograph of multiple round bumps of the HIV-1 virus on a cell surface. When newborns are infected with HIV, a new study suggests starting treatment right away is better than waiting just a few weeks to months. Harvard researchers found the earliest-treated babies had a much smaller “reservoir” of HIV still lurking in their bodies, and a better functioning immune system. (Cynthia Goldsmith/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention via AP)
November 27, 2019 - 11:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — When babies are born with HIV, starting treatment within hours to days is better than waiting even the few weeks to months that’s the norm in many countries, researchers reported Wednesday. The findings, from a small but unique study in Botswana, could influence care in Africa and...
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November 27, 2019 - 2:26 am
CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey hospital says a kidney meant for one patient was mistakenly transplanted into another with the same name who was farther down the priority list. Virtua Health says the Nov. 18 operation on a 51-year-old patient at Virtua Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Camden. was...
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