Diagnosis and treatment

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 10, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks about kidney health, accompanied by Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, left, in Washington. Azar says he and Trump are working on a plan to allow Americans to import lower-priced prescription drugs from Canada. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
July 31, 2019 - 3:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's plan to lower prescription drug prices (all times local): 6:20 p.m. It's unclear how soon consumers will see benefits from a Trump administration plan to allow Americans to legally and safely import lower-cost prescription drugs from Canada...
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July 31, 2019 - 3:44 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A blood-testing company filed for bankruptcy and says it's cutting jobs because Medicare payments have been withheld over allegations of fraud. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports True Health Diagnostics LLC filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection this week and notified...
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FILE - This May 1, 2018 file photo shows Merck corporate headquarters in Kenilworth, N.J. Merck & Co. reports earnings Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. Merck & Co., Inc. reports financial results on Tuesday, July 30, 2019. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
July 30, 2019 - 11:31 am
Soaring sales of its cancer blockbuster and vaccines helped drive Merck's second-quarter profit up a whopping 54%, blowing past Wall Street expectations. The maker of cancer immunotherapy drug Keytruda and diabetes pill Januvia also benefited from slightly reduced spending on research and...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2016, file photo, a prescription is filled at Pucci's Pharmacy in Sacramento, Calif. Four pharmaceutical companies are agreeing to pay California nearly $70 million to settle allegations that they delayed drugs to keep prices high. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Monday, July 29, 2019, that the bulk of the money will come from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries for paying to delay a generic narcolepsy drug from entering the market for nearly six years. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
July 29, 2019 - 12:59 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Four pharmaceutical companies collectively are agreeing to pay California nearly $70 million to settle allegations that they delayed drugs to keep prices high, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Monday. The bulk of the money will come from Teva Pharmaceutical...
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July 29, 2019 - 11:49 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says the government's employee health plan will tighten its rules for covering prescription opioid painkillers starting this fall. The announcement was made Monday at a White House drug policy briefing by a senior administration official who spoke on...
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FILE - This Sept. 17, 2015, file photo shows a sign barring smoking at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City. The signs were paid for by the Oklahoma Health Department, which works in conjunction with the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust to reduce smoking. Fifteen years after its creation, programs launched by the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust have dramatically reduced tobacco use among Oklahomans. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
July 29, 2019 - 11:48 am
The roughly 2,000 state and local governments suing the drug industry over the deadly opioid crisis have yet to see any verdicts or reach any big national settlements but are already tussling with each other over how to divide any money they collect. The reason: Some of them want to avoid what...
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Cancer patient Kim Lauerman poses for a portrait in her home Wednesday, June 26, 2019, in Alpharetta, Ga. After Lauerman was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, doctors wanted to give her a drug that helps prevent infections and fever during chemotherapy. Her insurer said no. Doctors say they worry about the growing influence insurers have over patient care. They say treatment delays and the problems they create are becoming common because routine things like imaging exams or prescriptions now require insurer approval first. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
July 29, 2019 - 11:01 am
After Kim Lauerman was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, doctors wanted to give her a drug that helps prevent infections and fever during chemotherapy. Her insurer said no. Anthem Blue Cross told Lauerman the drug wasn't necessary. She eventually got it after an infection landed her in the hospital,...
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In this Wednesday, July 17, 2019, photo, Laurie Barber, a Little Rock, Ark., ophthalmologist, talks with patient Carolyn Lay at the Little Rock Eye Clinic. Barber chairs a group that wants to hold a referendum on a new Arkansas law that expands the procedures that optometrists can perform. Arkansas optometrists who say they have to refer patients sometimes as far as an hour away successfully urged the Legislature this year to expand what procedures they can perform. But that change sparked an expensive and heated lobbying fight, and now faces the prospect of going before voters next year. (AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo)
July 26, 2019 - 7:00 am
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — As an optometrist in the small Arkansas town of Osceola, Matthew Jones must tell patients several times a week to seek treatment elsewhere — sometimes as far as an hour away — for procedures he says he's fully capable of performing. "They look at me and ask, 'Why don't you...
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In this June 15, 2018 photo, pharmaceuticals are seen in North Andover, Mass. A prescription drug compromise that would lower costs for Medicare recipients has cleared a key hurdle in the Senate, but Republican resistance signals trouble when the legislation goes to the floor. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
July 25, 2019 - 5:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A prescription drug compromise that would lower costs for Medicare recipients and save billions for Medicare and Medicaid cleared a key hurdle in the Senate on Thursday, but Republican resistance signaled trouble as the legislation faces floor consideration. The Finance Committee...
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FILE - This April 30, 2007, file photo, shows the headquarters of Cardinal Health in Dublin, Ohio. An executive at Cardinal Health, one of the nation’s largest drug distribution companies, said in a legal proceeding that the business has no obligation to the public when it comes to shipping prescription opioid painkillers. That’s one of the disclosures in thousands of pages of court documents made public July 23, 2019, in lawsuits over the opioid crisis. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
July 24, 2019 - 11:56 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — In 2012, as the death toll from the nation's opioid crisis mounted, drug companies shipped out enough of the powerful and addictive painkillers for every man, woman and child in the U.S. to have nearly a 20-day supply. In some counties, mostly in Appalachia, it was well over 100...
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