Civil rights violations

November 04, 2019 - 11:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seems ready to say police may pull over a car when they know only that its owner's license is not valid — even if they don't know who's driving. The issue of traffic stops based on information gleaned from motor vehicle records has become more pressing with the...
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In this Nov. 14, 2018 photo, East Hampton, Conn., Police Chief Dennis Woessner addresses the Town Council in East Hampton. Chief Woessner has concluded that an officer's membership in a far-right group infamous for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies didn't violate any department policies. Woessner said that officer Kevin P. Wilcox is no longer associated with the Proud Boys group. (Jeff Mill/The Middletown Press via AP)
October 15, 2019 - 3:43 pm
A Connecticut police officer's membership in the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, didn't violate department policies, the town's police chief has concluded in response to a civil rights group's concerns. The East Hampton officer, Kevin P...
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FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2019 file photo, an abortion opponent sings to herself outside the Jackson Womens Health Organization clinic in Jackson, Miss. Three judges from a conservative federal appeals court are hearing arguments, Monday, Oct. 7, over a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. Republican Gov. Phil Bryant signed the law in 2018, the state’s only abortion clinic immediately sued and U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves blocked the law from taking effect. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
October 07, 2019 - 12:45 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal court that rejected Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban should have let the state present evidence about whether a fetus experiences pain, an attorney for the state argued Monday. But a lawyer for Mississippi's only abortion clinic said the Supreme Court has been clear...
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Former Honolulu police officer Reginald Ramones, center, walks down a street in Honolulu on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019. Ramones has pleaded guilty to failing to report that another police officer forced a homeless man to lick a public urinal. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher)
September 25, 2019 - 8:09 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — A Honolulu homeless man fearing he would be arrested, reluctantly obeyed a police officer's orders to lick a urinal, according to a court document made public Wednesday after a former officer pleaded guilty to failing to report the incident. And it wasn't the first time. Officer...
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Comedian and media mogul Byron Allen poses for a picture Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, in Los Angeles. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Nov. 13 in a $20 billion lawsuit Allen filed against Comcast, with the outcome also affecting a $10 billion case he filed against Charter Communications. If Allen wins, it will become easier for black-owned businesses to bring and win civil rights lawsuits like his that allege discrimination in contracting. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
September 08, 2019 - 5:33 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is about to weigh in on a racial discrimination lawsuit involving Comcast and a Los Angeles-based media company owned by comedian and media mogul Byron Allen. A lower court ruled in favor of Allen, who says Comcast declined to distribute his channels because he's...
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August 19, 2019 - 9:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for a Maryland man whose murder conviction was chronicled in the hit podcast "Serial" are asking the Supreme Court to step into the case. Lawyers for defendant Adnan Syed say in court papers Monday that the justices should order a new trial for Syed and reverse a Maryland...
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July 23, 2019 - 9:06 am
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Two federal lawsuits claim South Carolina corrections officials violated prisoners' constitutional rights by failing to prevent a riot in which seven inmates were killed last year. The wrongful death lawsuits were filed Tuesday by representatives for the estates of two male...
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FILE - This Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, shows a Motel 6 in Phoenix. A revised settlement for Motel 6 guests who say the national chain invaded their privacy by giving their information to immigration authorities is returning to court for a judge's review. A federal judge is to decide Friday, July 19, 2019, on the proposal increasing to $10 million the total amount available for claims. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
July 19, 2019 - 4:28 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A federal judge told Motel 6 and civil rights attorneys Friday he plans to give his preliminary nod to a settlement in the case involving thousands of guests said to have had their privacy violated when the national chain gave their information to immigration authorities. Judge David...
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Gwen Carr, mother of chokehold victim Eric Garner, left, speaks outside the U.S. Attorney's office, in the Brooklyn borough of New York, as Garner's widow Esaw Snipes listens at right, Tuesday, July 16, 2019. Federal prosecutors won't bring civil rights charges against New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo, in the 2014 chokehold death of Garner, a decision made by Attorney General William Barr and announced one day before the five-year anniversary of his death, officials said. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
July 16, 2019 - 3:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — After years of silence, federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they won't bring criminal charges against a white New York City police officer in the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner, a black man whose dying words — "I can't breathe" — became a national rallying cry against police...
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FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump talks about drug prices during a visit to the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington. A federal judge Monday, July 8, 2019, blocked a major White House initiative on prescription drug costs, saying the Trump administration lacked the legal authority to require drugmakers to disclose their prices in TV ads. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
July 08, 2019 - 7:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge Monday blocked a major White House initiative on prescription drug costs, saying the Trump administration lacked the legal authority to require drugmakers to disclose their prices in TV ads. The narrow ruling by U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, D.C.,...
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