Biodiversity

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres speaks during an interview at United Nations headquarters on Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Guterres said the world has to change, not in small incremental ways but in big “transformative” ways into a green economy with electric vehicles and “clean cities” because the alternative “would mean a catastrophic situation for the whole world.” (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
May 08, 2019 - 1:21 pm
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The United Nations Secretary-General said the world must dramatically change the way it fuels factories, vehicles and homes to limit future warming to a level scientists call nearly impossible. That's because the alternative "would mean a catastrophic situation for the whole...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2018, file photo, a couple walks through a forest with the Frankfurt skyline in background near Frankfurt, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
May 07, 2019 - 7:30 am
You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is in trouble, estimated 1 million species are...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 9:23 am
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
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An image taken from video issued by Nekton shows Seychelles President Danny Faure, left, smiling after speaking from inside a submersible from the vessel Ocean Zephyr, under the water off the coast of Desroches, in the outer islands of Seychelles Sunday April 14, 2019. Faure toured the vessel and was presented with some of the findings and observations made by a British-led science expedition documenting changes taking place beneath the waves that could affect billions of people in the surrounding region over the coming decades (Nekton via AP)
April 14, 2019 - 5:45 am
DESROCHES ISLAND, Seychelles (AP) — In a striking speech delivered from deep below the ocean's surface, the Seychelles president on Sunday made a global plea for stronger protection of the "beating blue heart of our planet." President Danny Faure's call for action, the first-ever live speech from...
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March 26, 2019 - 1:53 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California crab fisheries will close for the season in April when whales are feeding off the state's coast as part of an effort to keep Dungeness crab fishery gear from killing protected whales, officials announced Tuesday. The April 15 closure, three months before the crab...
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FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 14, 2018 file photo, Russ Lewis covers his eyes from a gust of wind and a blast of sand as Hurricane Florence approaches Myrtle Beach, S.C. According to a scientific report from the United Nations released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
March 13, 2019 - 3:42 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says. Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics,...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 19, 2014 file photo, a pangolin carries its baby at a Bali zoo in Bali, Indonesia. Their scales _ made of keratin, the same material as in human finger nails _ are in high demand for Chinese traditional medicine, to allegedly cure several ailments, although there is no scientific backing for these beliefs. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati, File)
January 24, 2019 - 2:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When Chinese police found them in the trunk of a smuggler's car, 33 of the trafficked pangolins — endangered scaly mammals from southern China — were still alive, wrapped in plastic bags soaked with their own urine. But the fate of the creatures — whose scales are worth nearly...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2018, file photo, House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah., speaks on the Senate floor at the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City. An environmental group has denounced the committee for suggesting the organization’s efforts to block construction of a U.S. military base on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa may require it to register as foreign agent. The GOP-led Natural Resources Committee says it’s examining whether nonprofit groups are being manipulated by foreign entities that want to undercut American interests. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
October 19, 2018 - 7:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — An environmental group has denounced a House oversight committee for suggesting the organization's efforts to block construction of a U.S. military base on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa may require it to register as foreign agent. In a bluntly worded letter delivered...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 11:39 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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