Biodiversity

FILE - In this Thursday, June 19, 2014 file photo, a pangolin carries its baby at a Bali zoo in Bali, Indonesia. Their scales _ made of keratin, the same material as in human finger nails _ are in high demand for Chinese traditional medicine, to allegedly cure several ailments, although there is no scientific backing for these beliefs. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati, File)
January 24, 2019 - 2:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — When Chinese police found them in the trunk of a smuggler's car, 33 of the trafficked pangolins — endangered scaly mammals from southern China — were still alive, wrapped in plastic bags soaked with their own urine. But the fate of the creatures — whose scales are worth nearly...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2018, file photo, House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah., speaks on the Senate floor at the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City. An environmental group has denounced the committee for suggesting the organization’s efforts to block construction of a U.S. military base on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa may require it to register as foreign agent. The GOP-led Natural Resources Committee says it’s examining whether nonprofit groups are being manipulated by foreign entities that want to undercut American interests. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
October 19, 2018 - 7:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — An environmental group has denounced a House oversight committee for suggesting the organization's efforts to block construction of a U.S. military base on the southern Japanese island of Okinawa may require it to register as foreign agent. In a bluntly worded letter delivered...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 11:39 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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