Animal welfare

FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2019, file photo, Abel Cedillo rides Mongolian Groom in the Breeders' Cup Classic horse race at Santa Anita Park in Arcadia, Calif. A report on the death of Mongolian Groom in the Breeders' Cup Classic at Santa Anita says veterinarians missed opportunities to remove the gelding from the $6 million race because of time constraints or deficiencies in the process used to evaluate horses. In the 20-page report issued Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020, Dr. Larry Bramlage identified six suggested improvements aimed at refining safety and evaluation protocols for future events. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)
January 15, 2020 - 3:06 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A report on the death of Mongolian Groom in the Breeders' Cup Classic at Santa Anita says veterinarians missed opportunities to remove the gelding from the $6 million race because of time constraints or deficiencies in the process used to evaluate horses. In the 20-page report...
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In this Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019 photo, newly acquired miniature horses run in their paddock at Nexus Equine in Edmond, Okla. In partnership with a pilot program run by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Nexus Equine works to rescue horses and re-home them, providing care and training before the horses are adopted out. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
January 12, 2020 - 6:48 am
EDMOND, Okla. (AP) — When Ken Friend learned a job transfer meant moving his family to California from the small farm they’d been living on in rural Oklahoma, he knew he’d have to find new homes for his animals. In addition to the four dogs Friend had adopted over the 14 years he and his wife lived...
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019 photo, students dissect a synthetic frog from Syndaver Labs at J.W. Mitchell High School in New Port Richey, Fla. The school is the first in the world to try out the new technology. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
December 31, 2019 - 7:50 am
NEW PORT RICHEY, Fla. (AP) — It's a rite of passage in schools across the U.S.: frog dissection. Sometimes it happens in middle school, sometimes in high school. Feelings about the lesson are generally summed up in one word: gross. The frogs are slimy and greenish-grey, and they stink because they'...
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FIEL - In this image made from video taken on Dec. 22, 2019, and provided by Oakbank Balhannah CFS, a koala drinks water from a bottle given by a firefighter in Cudlee Creek, South Australia. Thousands of koalas are feared to have died in a wildfire-ravaged area north of Sydney, further diminishing Australia's iconic marsupial, while the fire danger accelerated Saturday, Dec. 28, 2019 in the country’s east as temperatures soared. (Oakbank Balhannah CFS via AP, File)
December 28, 2019 - 2:53 am
PERTH, Australia (AP) — Thousands of koalas are feared to have died in a wildfire-ravaged area north of Sydney, further diminishing Australia's iconic marsupial, while the fire danger increased in the country’s east on Saturday as temperatures soared. The mid-northern coast of New South Wales was...
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This Sept. 19, 2018 photo shows the last standing building above the Yellow Pine Pit open-pit gold mine in the Stibnite Mining District in central Idaho, where a company hopes to start mining again. Documents show the Trump administration intervening in a U.S. Forest Service decision so that a Canadian company could write a key environmental report on its proposed open-pit gold mines in central Idaho. (Riley Bunch/Idaho Press-Tribune via AP)
December 13, 2019 - 3:39 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Documents show the U.S. Forest Service allowing a Canadian company to write a key environmental report on its proposed open-pit gold mines in central Idaho after the Trump administration became involved. The documents obtained by conservation group Earthworks show British...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
December 01, 2019 - 10:50 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
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Farmer drive their tractors on the Paris ring road in Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019. French farmers are driving tractors into Paris and Lyon to protest stagnant revenues and unfair competition. The placard reads « Save your farmer ». (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
November 27, 2019 - 8:36 am
PARIS (AP) — Rumbling two by two down the ring road around Paris, disgruntled French farmers drove their tractors to the capital Wednesday to protest stagnant revenues and what they say is unfair global competition. The protest snarled traffic in the Paris area from daybreak to nightfall, as...
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November 25, 2019 - 8:15 am
NEW PORT RICHEY, Fla. (AP) — No frogs were harmed in the making of a Florida high school’s science class. J.W. Mitchell High School in New Port Richey began using synthetic frogs for educational dissections last Wednesday. Pasco County Superintendent Kurt Browning says it’s the first school in the...
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In this Sept 25, 2019 handout photo provided by the Fort Worth Zoo, Olaf is held by primary Puerto Rican crested toad zoo keeper Kelsey Barron, at the Fort Worth Zoo, in Fort Worth, Texas. Officials told The Associated Press Friday, Nov. 22, 2019, that Olaf, a critically endangered Puerto Rican toad, is one of more than 300 toads born via in vitro fertilization as U.S. scientists attempt to save it from extinction. (Fort Worth Zoo photo via AP)
November 22, 2019 - 4:49 pm
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — A critically endangered Puerto Rican toad was for the first time born via in vitro fertilization as U.S. scientists attempt to save it from extinction, officials announced Friday. Olaf - named in honor of the frozen semen he came from — is the first of more than 300...
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FILE - In this May 17, 1999, file photo, two Makah Indian whalers stand atop the carcass of a dead gray whale moments after helping tow it close to shore in the harbor at Neah Bay, Wash. Earlier in the day, Makah Indians hunted and killed the whale in their first successful hunt since voluntarily quitting whaling over 70 years earlier. Two decades after the Makah Indian tribe in the northwestern corner of Washington state conducted its last legal whale hunt from a hand-carved canoe, lawyers, government officials and animal rights activists will gather in a small hearing room in Seattle to determine whether the tribe will be allowed once again to harpoon gray whales as its people had done from time immemorial. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 14, 2019 - 4:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Patrick DePoe was in high school the last time his Native American tribe in Washington state was allowed to hunt whales. He was on a canoe that greeted the crew towing in the body of a gray whale. His shop class worked to clean the bones and reassemble the skeleton, which hangs in a...
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