FILE - This 1997 file photo shows one of five waterfalls on Havasu Creek as its waters tumble 210 feet on the Havasupai Tribe's reservation in a southeastern branch of the Grand Canyon near Supai, Ariz. Reservations open up next month for tourists eager to snag a camping spot at the bottom of the Grand Canyon where blue-green waterfalls appear like oases in the desert. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File)

Tribal land known for waterfalls won't allow tour guides

January 26, 2019 - 9:13 am

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Reservations open soon for tourists eager to snag a camping spot in an Arizona gorge known for its blue-green waterfalls.

None of the spots will be available to tour guides.

The Havasupai (hav-uh-SU'-peye) Tribe decided against issuing licenses to outfitters this year. That means anyone who wants to visit the tribe's land must bring their own food and gear.

Tribal spokeswoman Abbie Fink says the decision wasn't prompted by anything in particular. She says the tribe wants to handle all tourist traffic.

The remote reservation deep in a gorge outside Grand Canyon National Park has become increasingly popular because of social media.

Spots at the campground sell out within minutes of opening up Feb. 1.

Booking through a tour company had been another option for years.

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