Science

Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 9:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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Dr. Paul Scofield, senior curator natural history at Canterbury Museum, holds the fossil, a tibiotarsus, top, next to a similar bone of an Emperor Penguin in Christchurch, New Zealand, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Scientists in New Zealand say they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of a human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
August 14, 2019 - 5:15 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Scientists in New Zealand said Wednesday they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of an adult human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. They said the previously undiscovered species is believed to have stood...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 1997 file photo, then John McGrail, director of the Department of Energy stockpile stewardship program, talks about the $100 million Device Assembly Facility behind him at the Nevada Test Site in Mercury, Nev. Nevada's U.S. senators and Energy Secretary Rick Perry are set to tour the site north of Las Vegas where the federal government is handling weapons-grade plutonium shipped from South Carolina. A federal appeals court has ruled against Nevada in a legal battle over the U.S. government's secret shipment of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, denied the state's appeal after a judge refused to block any future shipments to Nevada. The court in San Francisco says the matter is moot because the Energy Department already sent the radioactive material and has promised that no more will be hauled there. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon, File)
August 13, 2019 - 6:59 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday ruled against Nevada in a battle with the U.S. government over its secret shipment of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas but the state's attorney general says the fight isn't over yet. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit...
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August 12, 2019 - 1:14 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — In a story Aug. 9 about a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announcement regarding the chemical glyphosate, The Associated Press misspelled the first name of a spokeswoman from Bayer AG. She is Charla Lord, not Chandra Lord. Also, in an early version of the story, the...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 6:40 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Asian carp are likely to find enough food to spread farther if they establish breeding populations in Lake Michigan, reinforcing the importance of preventing the invasive fish from gaining a foothold, scientists said in a paper released Monday. A study led by University...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 6:38 am
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread farther. The invasive fish have infested the Mississippi River and dozens of tributaries. Authorities are debating how to keep them out of the Great Lakes, where...
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FILE - This Sept. 4, 2017, aerial file photo shows Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant reactors, bottom from right, Unit 1, Unit 2 and Unit 3, in Okuma town, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. The utility company operating Fukushima's tsunami-wrecked nuclear power plant said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019 it will run out of space for tanks to store massive amounts of treated but still contaminated water in three years, adding pressure for the government and the public to reach consensus on what to do with the water. (Daisuke Suzuki/Kyodo News via AP, File)
August 09, 2019 - 8:27 am
TOKYO (AP) — The utility company operating Fukushima's tsunami-devastated nuclear power plant said Friday it will run out of space to store massive amounts of contaminated water in three years, adding pressure on the government and the public to reach a consensus on what to do with it. Three...
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FILE - This Monday, July 30, 2018 file photo shows rows of soybean plants in a field near Bennington, Neb. A report by the United Nations released on Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019 says that human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the planet’s land, while the way people use the Earth is making global warming worse. The vicious cycle is already making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious, as well as cutting the number of species on Earth, according to a special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
August 08, 2019 - 1:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the ground, climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals. A new United Nations scientific report examines how global warming and land interact in a vicious cycle. Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading...
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FILE - In this July 15, 2019, file photo, demonstrators block a road at the base of Hawaii's tallest mountain, in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, to protest the construction of a giant telescope on land that some Native Hawaiians consider sacred. The University of Hawaii's board is forming a task force to study the school's management of Mauna Kea's summit, which is currently at the center of long-running protests against the construction of a new telescope. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
August 05, 2019 - 6:04 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — The group behind a $1.4 billion telescope planned for Hawaii is applying for a permit to build in Spain as ongoing protests and a human blockade prevent them from starting construction on Mauna Kea, Hawaii's highest peak that some people consider sacred. The plan to start...
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In this Saturday, July 27, 2019 photo, retired nurse Tim Thomas, who assisted in a surgery in the parking lot of Watsonville Community Hospital after the facility lost power following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, poses during his visit to Lodi, Calif. California hospitals are asking lawmakers to scale back earthquake standards because they cost too much and might not be needed. Talk of scaling back the standards upsets Thomas, who was thrown to the floor during the earthquake. "To not make provisions to have the hospitals keep pace with the rest of the infrastructure doesn't make any sense to me" says Thomas. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
August 04, 2019 - 8:43 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A Southern California hospital spent $72 million on a building designed to do two things after an earthquake: stay standing and stay open. But when a pair of strong earthquakes struck the region last month, the hospital couldn't use it. Structurally, the building was OK...
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